Refrigerator Kosher Dill Pickles

For lots of us canning season is at its height about now. Everyone’s putting up luscious fruits and tasty veggies to enjoy throughout the year. One of our favorites and the recipe I do most every year is kosher dill pickles. I’ve only done a few quarts so far this year and really should get busy doing some more. I’ve done a few bread and butter pickles but no jams or preserves yet. Need to get those done while peaches are still at their peak. Can you tell that canning is something I really enjoy?

But what if you don’t have all the canning equipment or just don’t enjoy doing all that work? Well then, maybe refrigerator pickles would be more your style. These refrigerator kosher dill pickles are a copycat of those you find in the refrigerator section at your grocery store. I’m sure you know the brand :-)  They’re really, really easy to do and have a great flavor. I’d love for you to give these a try and let me know how you like them!

One word of warning about this recipe – if possible, open the windows before you start boiling the solution. It gives off a really strong onion odor. And don’t make this the day before you’re having company over because your house will still smell like it the day after :-)

If you happen to have fresh dill in your garden, you can use the heads in this recipe. Otherwise, dried dill seed works just as well. If you use the fresh dill, pack in the jars with the cucumbers. If using dill seed, put them in with the vinegar solution.

In a large saucepan, bring the water, vinegar, onion, garlic, mustard seed, canning salt and dill seed (if using) to a rapid boil. Cook until the salt has completely dissolved. Set the mixture aside and allow it to cool to room temperature.

Prepare six wide-mouth quart canning jars and lids. Wash the jars, lids, and rings thoroughly in hot, soapy water.  Rinse well.  Keep the lids warm in barely simmering water until ready to fill the jars. To sterilize the jars, place the jars in a large pot and fill with enough water to cover the jars. Bring to a boil. Boil 10 minutes. Remove the jars from the water using a canning jar lifter and place upside down on a kitchen towel to cool.

Prepping Cucumbers for Refrigerator Kosher Dill Pickles

Prepare the cucumbers by washing in cool water being careful to remove any dirt that may cling to the skin. Remove a 1/16” slice from the blossom end of each cucumber. Slice the cucumbers lengthwise into halves or quarters.

Packing jars for Refrigerator Kosher Dill Pickles

To each sterilized jar, add one head of fresh dill (if using) and pack with the cucumber halves or quarters. Pour the cooled mixture over the cucumbers in the jars. Wipe the rims with a dampened paper towel. Close the jars using two-piece canning lids.

Allow the jars to sit at room temperature for three days. Shake or turn the jars occasionally to distribute the seasonings. After three days, transfer the jars to the refrigerator. May be stored unopened in the refrigerator for six months.

Makes 6 quarts.

Note: Use only unwaxed, pickling type cucumbers for this recipe.

Enjoy!

Refrigerator Kosher Dill Pickles
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
A copycat recipe for the Claussen brand of kosher dill pickles found in the refrigerator case at your local supermarket.
Serves: 6 quarts
Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 quarts water
  • 2 cups cider vinegar
  • 1/3 cup dried minced onion
  • 6 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • 1 1/2 tsp. yellow mustard seed
  • 1/2 cup canning salt
  • About 18 pickling cucumbers
  • 6 heads fresh dill (or 4 1/2 tsp. dried dill seed)
Instructions
  1. In a large saucepan, bring the water, vinegar, onion, garlic, mustard seed, canning salt and dill seed (if using) to a rapid boil. Cook until the salt has completely dissolved. Set the mixture aside and allow to cool to room temperature.
  2. Prepare six wide-mouth quart canning jars and lids. Wash the jars, lids, and rings thoroughly in hot, soapy water. Rinse well. Keep the lids warm in barely simmering water until ready to fill the jars.
  3. To sterilize the jars, place the jars in a large pot and fill with water just to cover the jars. Bring to a boil. Boil 10 minutes. Remove the jars from the water using a canning jar lifter and place upside down on a kitchen towel to cool.
  4. Prepare the cucumbers by washing in cool water being careful to remove any dirt that may cling to the skin. Remove a 1/16” slice from the blossom end of each cucumber. Slice the cucumbers lengthwise into halves or quarters.
  5. To each sterilized jar, add one head of dill (if using) and pack with the cucumber halves or quarters.
  6. Pour the cooled mixture over the cucumbers in the jars. Wipe the rims with a dampened paper towel. Seal the jars using two-piece canning lids.
  7. Allow the jars to sit at room temperature for three days. Shake or turn the jars occasionally to distribute the seasonings. After three days, transfer the jars to the refrigerator. May be stored unopened in the refrigerator for six months.
  8. Makes 6 quarts.
Notes
Note: Use only unwaxed, pickling type cucumbers for this recipe.

Original recipe from what2cook.net

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Comments

  1. Jane says

    I am concerned about not using hot brine instead of the cold brine. Isn’t this risking bacteria? Shouldn’t they be put in the fridge immediatly?

    • Lana Stuart says

      Jane – I understand your concern. Refrigeration definitely slows down the growth of bacteria, but vinegar slows it even more. I felt that the amount of vinegar in the solution was sufficient to prevent problems. However, if you feel at all uncomfortable leaving the pickles out, by all means do refrigerate them immediately.

    • Lana Stuart says

      You’re welcome, Brenda. Your mom’s recipe sounds delicious and I’m planning on trying it next!

  2. Sue Busbani says

    I make a very good dill pickle that sounds somewhat the same but we call them solar pickles because we keep them outside in the sun for 3 days. They are topped with rye bread and then the lid is put on. No onions, just , dill, garlic, salt , vinegar and water! Very very good and just can’t make enough of them!

    • Lana Stuart says

      Now that’s something I’ve never heard of. Rye bread? Do you put it in the jar with the cucumbers, etc.? I’m intrigued.

  3. Heather says

    We made these yesterday and the tops never sealed. Are they supposed to or is that the reason for the refrigeration? If that’s the case, couldn’t you use old tops as long as they’re not bent? Either way, I’m sure my family will eat them before they go bad.

    • Lana Stuart says

      Hi Heather – they aren’t supposed to seal. You’d have to do a boiling water process on them to create a seal. That’s why they’re called “refrigerator” pickles. The jars and lids are sterilized to prevent any chance of contamination.

  4. Michaelle says

    These looks so yummy, specially for my 8 years old daughter who loves pickles. Could I still seal them and keep them in the pantry or these are just for refrigerate them?

    • Lana Stuart says

      Hi Michaelle – these are really good pickles, but the recipe is not for pantry storage, refrigerator storage only. It hasn’t been tested for canning and, based on my experience, this brine would not be acidic enough to make a safe, shelf-stable product.

  5. says

    making these NOW! in Sweden. Will let you know if they are SUPER…i am sure they are, as EVERYTHING I HAVE TRIED FROM YOUR PAGES ARE WONDERFUL!! You are a fine southern lady girl!! thank you for sending cooking ideas to a former Kentuckian whom lives in Sweden and other places in Europe for 40 years. HUG Michael

    • Lana Stuart says

      Kathy – you’ll see both regular dill pickles and kosher dill pickles on your grocery store shelves. In addition to the usual ingredients, kosher dill pickles have garlic and black peppercorns in the pickling liquid. The garlic and peppercorns may or may not be strained out before the pickles are packed into jars. I choose to leave them in.

  6. Brian Robichaud says

    Tried the recepie. Very easy. Let them set 3 days at room temperature, then 7 days in the fridge. I raised a quizzical eye brow at the 1/2 cup of salt. Boy oh boy! are they salty! What is the least amount of salt I can do without compromising the preservation factor? Otherwise, they were awesome! The crisp texture was amazing! I would also use fresh onion next batch.

    • says

      Since there is no “preservation factor” with this recipe, you can reduce the salt to any level you wish. These pickles are for refrigerator storage only. They’re not shelf stable so you don’t have to worry about preservation.

  7. Beth says

    Tried these a few days ago & my pickle loving family thinks they are great thanks! I did add a significant amount of minced garlic (about 4 T). I can’t imagine kosher dills without it.

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