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Irish Currant Scones

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5 from 3 votes
A traditional recipe for Irish cream scones with dried currants. Scones are quite similar to southern style biscuits and are made fresh daily in many homes.
Cook Time 12 minutes
Total Time 18 minutes
Irish currant scones on a linen napkin.

A traditional recipe for Irish currant scones. Irish scones are quite similar to southern style biscuits and are made fresh daily in many homes.

Irish currant scones on a linen napkin.

A few years ago, BeeBop and I celebrated our 20th anniversary by taking a 10-day trip to Ireland which turned out to be the trip of a lifetime! Ireland has always had a special place in my heart and soul. Many of my ancestors came from Ireland and for my entire life, I’ve felt a pull, a call, to go there.

From the moment we stepped off the plane in Shannon until we boarded for the return flight in Dublin, we felt welcome and “at home.” We didn’t meet a single Irish person who didn’t greet us with a friendly smile and a question or two. They really are the most friendly people I’ve ever met anywhere.

We spent our ten days in Ireland on a loosely planned sight-seeing tour with lots of time for just “wandering.” BeeBop drove us everywhere in a tiny little rental car on tiny little roads and we loved every single minute of it. Even the roads that were so narrow that one car would have to stop to let another pass. And he only got onto the wrong side of the road once! I was impressed since I constantly kept trying to get into the wrong side of the car.

We also learned pretty quickly how to interpret the road signs, too. “Bad bends” means sharp curves ahead, “rumble strips” are what we call speed breakers, and “traffic calming ahead” means to watch for slower traffic up ahead.

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The Beauty of Ireland

But what I’ll never forget about our trip to Ireland is the breathtaking beauty of the country. It really is 40 shades of green.

The Irish countryside
The countryside is gorgeous rolling hills and green fields as far as the eye can see.
Gorgeous black and white cows in the Irish countryside
Beef is a major product in Ireland with the added benefit of all that wonderfully rich cream and butter.
Irish high cross
What we enjoyed most about the whole trip, though, was all the ancient sites. This is one of the high crosses at Monasterboice. It was built about 521 A.D. That’s only about a thousand years before Columbus sailed to America. Amazing.
Rock of Cashel
The Rock of Cashel. Said to be the site of the conversion of the King of Munster by St. Patrick in the 5th century. The buildings date from the 12th and 13th century. St. Patrick’s cross is also located here.
Thatched cottage near Shannon, Ireland
A beautiful thatched cottage near Shannon, Ireland
The rugged Irish coast
A little glimpse of some of the very rugged Irish coastline.
Murphy's Pub in Dingle, Ireland
And at the end of each day, you can be sure that a pub is never far away!

Needless to say, I loved Ireland. Still love Ireland and I’d go back there in a minute! So, in celebration of St. Patrick’s Day this week, I baked a few Irish Currant Scones. We had scones and tea several afternoons in Ireland and I hope I’ve done them justice in this recipe.

How to Make Irish Currant Scones

Turn on the oven to preheat to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place it into the oven while it is preheating.

Dry ingredients in a mixing bowl.

Sift together flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt. Using your fingertips, work the softened butter into the flour until it resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in the currants.

Add 1/2 cup cream working the mixture as little as possible. Add more cream as needed to create a slightly sticky dough that holds together.

Scone dough rolled out on a floured board.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Using a floured rolling pin, roll the dough into a 1-inch thick circle. Cut into 8 wedges.

Remove the baking sheet from the oven and place the scones on it. Bake for 8 minutes, turn and bake for 4 more minutes or until just barely brown.

Serve with preserves, butter and/or sweetened whipped cream.

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Irish currant scones on a linen napkin.

Irish Currant Scones

A traditional recipe for Irish cream scones with dried currants. Scones are quite similar to southern style biscuits and are made fresh daily in many homes.
5 from 3 votes
Print It Rate It
Course: Breads
Cuisine: Irish
Prep Time: 6 minutes
Cook Time: 12 minutes
Total Time: 18 minutes
Servings: 8 scones
Calories: 233kcal
Author: Lana Stuart

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons softened butter
  • ½ cup currants
  • ½ cup heavy whipping cream (may need up to 3/4 cup)

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  • Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place it into the oven while it is preheating.
  • Sift together flour, baking powder, sugar and salt.
  • Using your fingertips, work the softened butter into the flour until it resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in the currants.
  • Add 1/2 cup cream working the mixture as little as possible.
  • Add more cream if needed to create a slightly sticky dough that holds together.
  • Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface.
  • Using a floured rolling pin, roll the dough into a 1-inch thick circle. Cut into 8 wedges.
  • Remove the baking sheet from oven and place the scones on it.
  • Bake for 8 minutes, turn and bake for 4 more minutes or until just barely brown.
  • Serve with preserves, butter and/or sweetened whipped cream.

Notes

Nutrition Information

Serving: 1 | Calories: 233kcal | Carbohydrates: 32g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 10g | Saturated Fat: 6g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 32mg | Sodium: 494mg | Potassium: 127mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 356IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 112mg | Iron: 2mg

Nutrition information is calculated by software based on the ingredients in each recipe. It is an estimate only and is provided for informational purposes. You should consult your health care provider or a registered dietitian if precise nutrition calculations are needed for health reasons.

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26 Comments

  1. May the road rise to meet you
    May the wind be at your back
    May the sun shine warmly on your face
    May the ran fall softly on your fields
    And, until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of His hand.

    Irish Blessing.
    Miss P

  2. Who doesnt love a great scone! Now this is really authentic as well.. I am a huge fan of them. Tried three types this year this one will be the fourth cant wait!

  3. It’s about time for some traditionally Irish food! I’m tired of seeing Guinness cupcakes and the like, haha. These scones look wonderful. I know my Irish-Italian family who is visiting soon would just love them! :) Thanks for sharing. Happy (almost) St. Patrick’s Day!

    1. And a very Happy St. Patrick’s Day to you, too, Georgia! Try the scones with a little whipped cream and strawberry jam.

  4. That does sound like the trip of a lifetime! I’ve always wanted to visit Ireland. I feel like you’ve just taken me there. These scones look positively delightful! Thanks so much for sharing a piece of your experience.

    1. It really was a magical trip! And I’m so glad that we didn’t go with a tour group but just took our time and wandered from place to place. Of course, we had several things planned that we wanted to see while there, but found so much more just driving around!

  5. happy, happy sigh Lana . . . because Ireland is on our list to travel to someday and i just loved reading about your trip and even more the photos; they are just dreamy . . . and those scones are pretty terrific looking too!

    1. Debra – I left a part of my heart in Ireland. And I fully plan to go back again some day! One of the most fun things of the trip was the afternoon we spent with our carriage driver, Ulton, at the Muckross House. Ulton was pure Irish from his head to his toes and could spin a yarn like you’ve never heard!

  6. Oh, your pictures take me back to the trip my husband and I took to Ireland in the 1990s (pre kids). What a beautiful country it is and what wonderful breads they serve.

    1. Kristen, I could have written a whole series of posts on our trip! We had those wonderful Irish breakfasts each morning and the selection of breads, as you say, was unbelievable. Along with the fresh cream, butter and Irish cheese…..oh, yum!

  7. Hi Lana….Loved all those pictures and the virtual tour of such a lovely place…

    This scone is something i would love to have right now. I am making it very soon.

  8. These look just wonderful and I think I’m going to have to honor my Irish ancestors and make some scones this weekend.

  9. That must have been a trip of a lifetime…gorgeous pictures, and deliicous scones. Some clotted cream & a scone and I’d be singing!

  10. Great pics and wonderful memories Lana-enjoy the scones! Happy St. Patrick’s Day:@)

  11. Have always wanted to travel to Ireland. Sounds like you had a lovely trip (and came away with a lovely recipe!)

  12. What a beautiful post! I have Irish blood in me too, and have felt that same pull. I don’t know that I’ll ever make it (doubtful) but maybe in the afterlife! The scones look perfect – wish I had one right now!

    1. I can’t explain it, Mary, but I’ve always felt the strongest pull on my heart strings coming from Ireland. And all the time we were there I just felt like this was home.

  13. Such a yum-worthy recipe, Lana! These would be perfect with traditional clotted cream and perhaps a tiny bit of jam too.

    1. Oh, of course! I meant to add that at the end of the recipe. These are fabulous with a little strawberry jam and, if you can get it, clotted cream. Otherwise, some softened unsalted butter or some softly whipped cream are fine accompaniments as well.