Recipes » Canning and Preserving Recipes » Refrigerator Kosher Dill Pickles – Claussen Copycat Recipe

Refrigerator Kosher Dill Pickles – Claussen Copycat Recipe

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5 from 27 votes
Delicious, crispy Refrigerator Kosher Dill Pickles without the canning process! You'll love my copycat recipe of the famous Claussen brand of dill pickles found in your grocery store's refrigerator case.
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Glass jars of refrigerator dill pickles.

Delicious, crispy Refrigerator Kosher Dill Pickles without the canning process! If you’re a dill pickle fan but not enthusiastic about canning, you’ll love my copycat recipe of the famous Claussen brand of dill pickles found in your grocery store’s refrigerator case.

For lots of us, canning season is at its height about now. Everyone’s putting up luscious fruits and tasty veggies to enjoy throughout the year.

Glass jars of refrigerator dill pickles.

One of our family’s favorites and the recipe I do without fail every year is kosher dill pickles. I’ve only done a few quarts so far this year and really should get busy doing some more.

I’ve done a few Quick Pickled Jalapenos and some bread and butter pickles but no jams or preserves yet. Need to get those done while peaches are still at their peak. And maybe make some Okra Chips as well. Can you tell that preserving and canning is something I really enjoy?

But what if you don’t have all the canning equipment or just don’t enjoy doing all that work? Well then, maybe refrigerator pickles would be more your style.

These refrigerator kosher dill pickles are a copycat of the Claussen brand you find in the refrigerator section at your grocery store. They’re really, really easy to do and have a great crunch and flavor. I’d love for you to give these a try and let me know how you like them!

Why You’ll Love This Recipe


  • No boiling water bath required.
  • No special canning equipment needed.
  • Very easy! You don’t need to be a “canning person” to make these.
  • They’re crunchier than canned pickles and taste very much like the name brand.

Ingredient Notes


  • Pickling cucumbers (also known as “kirby” cucumbers or sometimes “salad” cucumbers; be sure not to purchase the regular waxed cucumbers for this)
  • Cider vinegar
  • Dried minced onion (you’ll find this in the spice aisle at your grocery store)
  • Fresh garlic
  • Yellow mustard seed (also in your grocery store’s spice section)
  • Canning salt (we use canning salt because it’s completely pure salt and will keep the pickle brine nice and clear)
  • Fresh dill heads or dried dill seed (find fresh dill in your grocery store’s produce section or dried dill seed with the spices)

You’ll find detailed measurements for all ingredients in the printable version of the recipe at the bottom of this post.

How to Make Refrigerator Kosher Dill Pickles


One word of warning about this recipe – if possible, open the windows before you start boiling the solution. It gives off a really strong onion odor. And don’t make this the day before you’re having company over because your house will still smell like it the day after :-)

TIP: If you happen to have fresh dill in your garden or from your grocery store, you can use the heads in this recipe. Otherwise, dried dill seed works just as well. If you use the fresh dill, pack it in the jars with the cucumbers. If using dill seed, put them in with the vinegar solution.

Make the Brine

Brine boiling in a large pot.

In a large saucepan, bring the water, vinegar, onion, garlic, mustard seed, canning salt and dill seed (if using) to a rapid boil. Cook until the salt has completely dissolved. Set the mixture aside and allow it to cool to room temperature.

Prepare the Jars

Prepare six wide-mouth quart canning jars and lids. Wash the jars, lids, and rings thoroughly in hot, soapy water. Rinse well. Keep the lids warm in barely simmering water.

To sterilize the jars, place them in a large pot filled with enough water to cover. Bring to a boil. Boil 10 minutes. Remove the jars from the water using a canning jar lifter and place them upside down on a kitchen towel to cool.

Prep the Cucumbers

Cucumbers cut in half on a cutting board.

Prepare the cucumbers by washing in cool water being careful to remove any dirt that may cling to the skin. Remove a 1/16” slice from the blossom end of each cucumber. Slice the cucumbers lengthwise into halves or quarters.

Fill the Jars

Cucumbers packed into glass jars.

To each sterilized jar, add one head of fresh dill (if using) and pack with the cucumber halves or quarters. Pour the cooled mixture over the cucumbers in the jars.

Wipe the rims with a dampened paper towel. Add a canning lid and ring to each jar. Turn the ring until you meet resistance. Don’t over tighten the rings.

Store the Pickles

Allow the jars to sit at room temperature for three days. Shake or turn the jars occasionally to distribute the seasonings. This short standing time allows for a very light fermentation process to take place.

After three days, transfer the jars to the refrigerator. May be stored unopened in the refrigerator for six months.

Glass jars of refrigerator dill pickles.

Tips and Variations


  • Be sure to use only pickling type cucumbers for the recipe (pickling cucumbers are also called “kirby” or sometimes “salad” cucumbers). Don’t purchase the typical waxed cucumbers found in the the produce section.
  • Because this isn’t a canning recipe (i.e., it isn’t being prepared for pantry storage and it’s not shelf-stable), you can vary the ingredients a bit to suit your taste —
    • if you like your pickles hot, add a dried red pepper pod to each jar along with the cucumbers.
    • the amount of salt may be reduced.
    • additional spices may be added; suggestions include dried coriander and/or dried red pepper flakes.
  • Use pickling salt (no table salt or kosher salt) in order to prevent cloudiness of the brine.
  • White vinegar may be used in place of cider vinegar. There will be a subtle difference in flavor.

FAQs


What’s the difference between regular dill pickles and kosher dill pickles?

Without getting into the technicalities of Jewish dietary requirements, typically kosher dills contain garlic and peppercorns in the brine. Regular dills generally do not include them.

Why can’t I store these pickles in the pantry?

Pickles produced using this recipe must be stored in the refrigerator after the three-day standing time because they haven’t been processed to create a seal between the lid and the jar.

Where can I get pickling cucumbers?

You can always grow your own. Or check your local farmers’ markets and grocery stores. I buy mine at the local Wal-Mart.

Can other vegetables be pickled?

Yes, you can pickle many different kinds of vegetables! And they’re delicious, too. Try sliced carrots, cauliflower florets, celery, and sweet bell peppers.

More Pickling Recipes


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Recipe

Glass jars of refrigerator dill pickles.

Refrigerator Kosher Dill Pickles

Delicious, crispy Refrigerator Kosher Dill Pickles without the canning process! You'll love my copycat recipe of the famous Claussen brand of dill pickles found in your grocery store's refrigerator case.
5 from 27 votes
Print It Rate It
Course: Canning and Preserving
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Inactive Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 40 minutes
Servings: 36 servings
Calories: 24kcal
Author: Lana Stuart

Ingredients

  • 6 cups water
  • 2 cups cider vinegar
  • cup dried minced onion
  • 6 garlic cloves finely minced
  • 1 ½ teaspoons yellow mustard seed
  • cup canning salt
  • About 18 pickling cucumbers
  • 6 heads fresh dill or 4 ½ teaspoons dried dill seed

Instructions

  • In a large saucepan, bring the water, vinegar, onion, garlic, mustard seed, canning salt and dill seed (if using) to a rapid boil. Cook until the salt has completely dissolved. Set the mixture aside and allow to cool to room temperature.
  • Prepare six wide-mouth quart canning jars and lids. Wash the jars, lids, and rings thoroughly in hot, soapy water. Rinse well. Keep the lids warm in barely simmering water until ready to fill the jars.
  • To sterilize the jars, place the jars in a large pot and fill with water just to cover the jars. Bring to a boil. Boil 10 minutes. Remove the jars from the water using a canning jar lifter and place upside down on a kitchen towel to cool.
  • Prepare the cucumbers by washing in cool water being careful to remove any dirt that may cling to the skin. Remove a 1/16” slice from the blossom end of each cucumber. Slice the cucumbers lengthwise into halves or quarters.
  • To each sterilized jar, add one head of dill (if using) and pack with the cucumber halves or quarters.
  • Pour the cooled mixture over the cucumbers in the jars. Wipe the rims with a dampened paper towel. Seal the jars using two-piece canning lids.
  • Allow the jars to sit at room temperature for three days. Shake or turn the jars occasionally to distribute the seasonings. After three days, transfer the jars to the refrigerator. May be stored unopened in the refrigerator for six months.
  • Makes 6 quarts.

Notes

Makes 6 quarts.
TIPS:
  • If possible, open the windows before you start boiling the solution. It gives off a really strong onion odor
  • Use pickling cucumbers (also known as “kirby” cucumbers or sometimes “salad” cucumbers; be sure not to purchase the regular waxed cucumbers for this)
  • Find dried minced onion, yellow mustard seed, and dill seed in the spice aisle at your grocery store
  • Canning salt is recommended to keep the pickle brine nice and clear
  • If using fresh dill, pack it in the jars with the cucumbers. If using dill seed, put them in with the vinegar solution.
  • White vinegar may be used in place of cider vinegar. There will be a subtle difference in flavor.
  • Pickles produced using this recipe must be stored in the refrigerator after the three-day standing time because they haven’t been processed to create a seal between the lid and the jar.
Because this isn’t a canning recipe (i.e., it isn’t being prepared for pantry storage and it’s not shelf-stable), you can vary the ingredients a bit to suit your taste:
  • if you like your pickles hot, add a dried red pepper pod to each jar along with the cucumbers.
  • the amount of salt may be reduced.
  • additional spices may be added; suggestions include dried coriander and/or dried red pepper flakes.

Nutrition Information

Serving: 1 | Calories: 24kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 1578mg | Potassium: 227mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 121IU | Vitamin C: 5mg | Calcium: 27mg | Iron: 1mg

Nutrition information is calculated by software based on the ingredients in each recipe. It is an estimate only and is provided for informational purposes. You should consult your health care provider or a registered dietitian if precise nutrition calculations are needed for health reasons.

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Recipe Rating




70 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    These are my favorite! I’ve tried many refrigerator pickle recipes trying to find one that tastes like a Claussen and this is it!
    Thank you!
    Curious though, do you strain off the ingredients and just use the brine?

  2. Why do you let the brining solution cool? I thought the brine needed to be hot when poured into the jars and sealed?

    1. For this recipe you allow the brine to cool in order to retain the crispness of the cucumbers. This is NOT a canning recipe. The jars are not water bathed for a heat seal and that’s why they’re stored in the refrigerator.

      1. Oh interesting. I’ve been using the Mrs wages refrigerator mix, and following those directions, which have you poor the hot liquid into the jars and put the cap on and then store in the refrigerator once it cools. I always hear the top pop when it seals while cooling. I’m going to have to try your recipe and method and see how it compares!

      2. The reason they have you store the jars in the refrigerator is because that is not a true seal. You may hear the top ping but that does not mean the jar is actually sealed. Canned foods have to be processed in a boiling water bath (or in a pressure canner for low acid foods) to actually create a seal. Just making the lid pop or ping doesn’t make a seal and is not safe to store outside of the refrigerator.

  3. Why does it need to sit out at room temperature for 3 days? Wouldn’t it last longer in the fridge if it was put into the fridge right away?

    1. As I stated in the post, the three day period at room temperature allows the pickles to go through a quick fermenting process to develop the flavors. They’re then stored in the refrigerator to both stop the fermentation and to lengthen storage. Three days at room temp doesn’t affect how long they can be successfully stored in the fridge.

  4. I made these pickles yesterday and can’t wait to try! how long do I wait to eat after they are refrigerated?

      1. Thank you
        Can I use this brine recipe in my canned dill pickles?
        I would cook it like a pickle brine would be done.
        I would can the pickles.

  5. 5 stars
    Simple yet simply delicious!
    I added 1/4 tsp pickle crisp.
    Thank you for a recipe that can be used as my small crop of cucumbers are ready to pick!

    1. It needs to cover the cucumbers. Because this is not a canning recipe, the exact level isn’t important as long as everything in the jar is covered. If you didn’t have enough liquid, that typically means you didn’t pack your jars with enough cucumbers.

  6. I tried this recipe for the first time this year and we love it! My daughter can get enough. I would love to be able to keep them longer. Can I can them in a hot Water bath so I can store them on a shelf?

  7. 5 stars
    This recipe is the best. Anyone who has tasted these pickles I made, beg for more! A forever keeper recipe

  8. 5 stars
    I made these the other day and I was amazed how much like Claussens they are. I didn’t have fresh dill so I substituted dried and I used fresh onion. Thank you !!

    1. Yes, apple cider vinegar. I normally use the Heinz brand because it’s clarified (not raw) and won’t cloud the pickling brine like some others do.