Chicken Jallop

by Lana Stuart on March 22, 2010 · 20 comments

Chicken Jallop

I have a recipe for you today that I’m willing to bet no more than a dozen of you have ever heard of. Maybe fewer even. (Miss P – you don’t count!) This is my grandmother, Polly’s, Chicken Jallop. I’ve done some internet research on Chicken Jallop and have found very few references. One reference I did find was in the New Georgia Encyclopedia which indicates that what we call Chicken Jallop in south Georgia is called Chicken Mull in north Georgia. However, their description does not really match what I’ve known all my life to be Chicken Jallop. Especially the part about adding crumbled saltine crackers. Hmmm.

Anyway, Chicken Jallop is nothing more than a chicken stew. Polly used to make this recipe pretty frequently. She was pretty well known in our area for this recipe, too. I believe she usually served her jallop over chow mein noodles, but my mama served it over toasted hamburger buns. I don’t know why, it’s just the way you eat jallop. BeeBop recently suggested that I should have a category in my recipe index for “heritage” recipes. Well, this one would definitely belong in that category. Hope you enjoy it as much as our family does.

What are some of your “heritage” recipes? What recipe is there that just the thought of it makes you think of home?

1 3.5 to 4 pound frying chicken
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 medium onions, diced
4 stalks celery, diced
1/4 green bell pepper, diced
1 pod red chili pepper
1 bay leaf
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 stick butter or margarine, melted
1 can cream of mushroom soup
Salt and pepper to taste

For serving:
hamburger buns
butter

Place the chicken in a pressure cooker with 1 cup water. Cook for 12 minutes after pressure cooker achieves a seal and weight begins to rock gently. Cool immediately to release pressure. Allow chicken to cool enough to handle, then remove all skin and bones. Set meat aside. Reserve all liquid remaining in pressure cooker. (Note: if you do not want to use a pressure cooker, simply cook the chicken in enough water to cover until done. Reserve 2-3 cups of cooking liquid. Remove meat from skin and bones and proceed with recipe.)

While the chicken is cooking, preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Place the flour in a cast iron skillet and cook in the oven, stirring quite frequently, until lightly browned. Set aside.

To the stock remaining in the pressure cooker, add onions, celery, green pepper, red chili pepper, bay leaf and garlic. Cook over medium heat (not under pressure) for approximately 10 minutes.

Add all the reserved meat to the pot.

In a medium bowl, use a whisk to combine the melted butter or margarine, cream of mushroom soup and the browned flour. Mix well to combine. Add to the hot mixture stirring well. Reduce heat and simmer for one hour.

When ready to serve, remove the bay leaf and red chili pepper. Open hamburger buns and spread each side with butter or margarine. Place under broiler until toasted. Place two bun halves in a bowl. Pour jallop over the buns and serve immediately.

Enjoy!

Chicken Jallop

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 45 minutes

Total Time: 2 hours

Chicken Jallop

A south Georgia traditional recipe for Chicken Jallop - a chicken stew served over toasted hamburger buns.

Ingredients

  • 1 3.5 to 4 pound frying chicken
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 medium onions, diced
  • 4 stalks celery, diced
  • 1/4 green bell pepper, diced
  • 1 pod red chili pepper
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 stick butter or margarine, melted
  • 1 can cream of mushroom soup
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • For serving:
  • hamburger buns
  • butter

Instructions

  1. Place chicken in pressure cooker with 1 cup water. Cook for 12 minutes after pressure cooker achieves a seal and weight begins to rock gently. Cool immediately to release pressure. Allow chicken to cool enough to handle, then remove all skin and bones. Set meat aside.
  2. Reserve all liquid remaining in pressure cooker. (Note: if you do not want to use a pressure cooker, simply cook the chicken in enough water to cover until done.Reserve 2-3 cups of cooking liquid. Remove meat from skin and bones and proceed with recipe.)
  3. While chicken is cooking, preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  4. Place flour in a cast iron skillet and cook in oven, stirring frequently, until lightly browned. Set aside.
  5. To the stock, add onions, celery, green pepper, red chili pepper, bay leaf and garlic. Cook over medium heat for approximately 10 minutes.
  6. Add all the reserved meat to the pan. In a medium bowl, combine melted butter or margarine, cream of mushroom soup and browned flour. Mix well to combine. Add to the hot mixture stirring well. Reduce heat and simmer for one hour.
  7. When ready to serve, remove bay leaf and red chili pepper. Open hamburger buns and spread each side with butter or margarine. Place under broiler until toasted. Place two bun halves in a bowl. Pour jallop over the buns and serve immediately.

Notes

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http://www.lanascooking.com/2010/03/22/chicken-jallop/

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{ 18 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Amy from She Wears Many Hat March 22, 2010 at 4:45 pm

O lawd, my mouth is watering. Bet it’d be good over rice too. Yummy.

Reply

2 Kay March 22, 2010 at 5:47 pm

I really, really have to make this! I second Amy on serving this over rice, though!

Seeing this I think you might just like my Cazuela de pollo as well!

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3 Lana March 22, 2010 at 7:13 pm

Kay: I just went over and looked up your Cazuela de Pollo and it looks delicious. Much more appealing to me than the usual chicken broth and noodle type of soup. I’m making a note to try that recipe soon!

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4 Kay March 22, 2010 at 5:57 pm

p.s so glad to see you don’t rinse your chicken either :)

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5 Lana March 23, 2010 at 10:22 am

No, I don’t. Rinsing it can potentially contaminate everything it comes in contact with. The sink, countertops if you splash, etc. The cooking process will kill any bacteria that may be lurking on the chicken so rinsing is just not necessary and can actually be dangerous.

Reply

6 Miss P March 22, 2010 at 6:25 pm

I went to the kitchen and pulled a classic cookbook. This is exactly the same recipe as Aunt Margie published in the Centennial Cookbook of First Baptist Church (1986). She was probably the best cook of her generation in the entire family. Her directions state to serve over toasted hamburger buns, or chow mein noodles. I always liked those crunchy chow mein noodles, straight out of the can, with Coca Cola.

Howeve, I cannot undertake this recipe as directed. You might recall that time that I unfortunately kind of “blew up” the kitchen at the house on Third Street with a pressure cooker….. chicken on the ceiling …… don’t tell Mama, she may not have known about that one. I have been scarred for life, and will not touch a pressure cooker with a ten foot pole.

Aside from that episode, thanks for the memory.

Miss P

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7 Lana March 22, 2010 at 7:15 pm

Oh, yeah. I remember the exploding pressure cooker. How did we ever get all that mess off the ceiling? If you still can’t bring yourself to use one, you can just cook the chicken in some water until it’s done and the proceed with the recipe. It’ll just take longer.

Actually, that cookbook is where I got the recipe. I talked to Mama about it and she said that Aunt Margie put it in the cookbook, but it’s really Polly’s recipe :-)

Reply

8 jean March 23, 2010 at 2:49 am

i personally got a kick out seeing you use the pressure cooker as i’ve heard that that nobody uses this utensil expect for the Indians & Iam one who does all her indian cooking in one. This dish is finding its place on my dinner table tonight!!!!

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9 Lana March 23, 2010 at 10:24 am

Oh my goodness – I use my pressure cooker quite often! It makes a great beef stew in about 15 minutes. Tastes like it’s been cooking all day long.

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10 The Duo Dishes March 23, 2010 at 10:43 am

Never heard of this! It’s great that you’re sharing it though. Will have to ask around about jallop during the next trip to GA. Peach cobbler is the one true recipe that scream home cookin’.

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11 Teri (evilstepmomster) March 23, 2010 at 12:24 pm

Ooooh.
I’ve never used and don’t even own a pressure cooker so thanks for giving the alternative.
This looks way too good to pass up and easy enough too!
Love the idea of putting it on toasted bun.
Thanks!

Reply

12 Karen Bove March 23, 2010 at 2:12 pm

Oh, this reminds me of family stories and old recipes! There’s a story about my grandfather, a pressure cooker mishap and lots of corn all over the kitchen. And the recipe reminds me that I need to go through my grandmother’s recipe box again, along with her church cookbook, and start making some of those good ol’ southern favorites.

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13 Almost Slowfood March 23, 2010 at 3:58 pm

I have never ever heard of this, but it looks so good!!! Will have to try it out.

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14 Neena March 23, 2010 at 6:38 pm

Looks great. I haven’t made this in years. I think we started eating this over buns, because I did not have the noodles one time when I made it. We had to improvise. Yes, I do remember the chicken on the ceiling. It was one Sunday morning and we were getting ready for church. I was making something chicken for Sunday dinner. Can’t remember what. Needless to say, we did not use that chicken. I don’t think we made it to church either. If I remember right all of us had to clean the kitchen ceiling and all. What fun we had.

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15 Cate O'Malley March 23, 2010 at 8:12 pm

Looks delicious, and total comfort food!

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16 Miss P March 26, 2010 at 12:13 pm

If you want to share heritage recipes, I suggest Mama’s Turkey & Dressing. It’s a little warm for that right now, but this is something that needs a bit of practice prior to Thanksgiving!
Take care.
Miss P

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17 Lana March 26, 2010 at 5:09 pm

You’re right about that dressing being a heritage recipe! No one makes better dressing than Mama. Since we don’t get to be there for Thanksgiving any more, I’ve been working on it for the past few years and I’ve nearly got it down. BeeBop declared that this past Thanksgiving’s dressing was almost — almost — as good as Neena’s.

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18 Gooch April 6, 2010 at 12:04 pm

Oh, I have definitely heard of Jallop. Even been to a couple of “Jallop Suppers”!
:-)

Sounds great. I haven’t had Jallop since I was a kid.

Reply

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