Home » Recipes » Main Dish Recipes » Chicken Jallop

Chicken Jallop

Chicken Jallop is a very old, traditional southwest Georgia recipe that is essentially a Southern chicken stew served over toasted hamburger buns. It’s not made very often these days, but in the past, you’d find this recipe served at many church and social gatherings.

I have a recipe for you today that I’m willing to bet no more than a dozen people reading this have ever heard of. Maybe even fewer. This is my grandmother Polly’s Chicken Jallop.

Chicken Jallop over toasted hamburger buns on a serving plate.

I’ve done some internet research on Chicken Jallop and have found very few references. There is one reference in the New Georgia Encyclopedia, which states that the recipe we call Chicken Jallop in south Georgia is called Chicken Mull in north Georgia. However, their description does not at all match the recipe that I’ve known all my life as Chicken Jallop. Especially the part about adding crumbled saltine crackers. We don’t do that.

Chicken Jallop is nothing more than a chicken stew. Polly used to make this recipe frequently, and she was well known in our area for it. She usually served her jallop over chow mein noodles, but my mama serves it over toasted hamburger buns. I don’t know why, except that those are just the two ways you traditionally serve jallop.

If you check my recipe categories, you’ll see that I have an entire section of “heritage” recipes. Well, this one definitely belongs in that category. It’s one of the most delicious examples I know of southern comfort food. I hope you enjoy it as much as our family does.

Ingredients You’ll Need

  • Whole Chicken – Look for a whole chicken that’s close to four pounds in weight. Or use pieces (thighs and breasts, preferably) that are skin-on, bone-in, and equal a total weight of about 4 pounds.
  • All-Purpose Flour – This recipe uses the unusual technique of browning the flour in a cast-iron skillet in the oven. That’s called a “dry roux” and, in my opinion, is much easier and less messy than the traditional method of browning the flour in oil on the stovetop.
  • Onions, Celery, and Bell Pepper – This combination is often called the trinity of Cajun cooking. It’s found throughout the South, not only in Cajun/Creole recipes, and adds wonderful flavor to stewed dishes.
  • Red Chili Pepper – If you enjoy a hit of heat, use the chili pepper. If not, simply omit it.
  • Cream of Mushroom Soup – I use canned, creamed soups in many of my recipes. They’re ubiquitous to the era in which this Southern comfort food recipe originated. If you prefer to make your own from scratch, try the Cream of Mushroom Soup recipe over at Culinary Hill.

The complete ingredient list with detailed measurements is included in the printable recipe card at the bottom of this post.

How to Make Chicken Jallop

Cook the Chicken

Chicken and by leaves in a deep pot covered in water.
STEP 1.
  1. Place the chicken and bay leaves in a deep pot with enough water to just cover the chicken. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook covered until the chicken is tender (about 40 minutes).

👉 PRO TIP: This step can easily be done in the pressure cooker or instant pot. Place the chicken in the cooker with 1 cup water. Set the instant pot for 12 minutes at high (or cook for 12 minutes after the pressure cooker achieves a seal). Cool immediately to release the pressure.

Remove the Meat

Chicken with skin and bones removed in a mixing bowl.
STEP 2.
  1. Remove the chicken from the broth and allow it to cool enough to handle. Remove and discard all skin and bones. Set the meat aside. Reserve all the broth.

Brown the Flour

  1. While the chicken is cooking, preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  1. Place the flour in a cast iron skillet and cook it in the oven, stirring about every 10 minutes, until lightly browned (this step takes about 40 minutes). Set the flour aside.

Cook the Vegetables

Chopped garlic, onion, bell pepper, and celery on a cutting board.
STEP 5.
  1. Chop or dice the garlic, onions, green bell pepper, and celery.

Finish the Jallop

  1. Bring the reserved stock to a boil. Add the vegetables and cook over medium heat for approximately 10 minutes.
  2. Add all the reserved meat to the pot and bring to a gentle boil.

Thicken the Stew

  1. In a medium bowl, use a whisk to combine the melted butter, cream of mushroom soup, and the browned flour. Mix until thoroughly combined and free of any lumps.
  2. Add the butter-soup-flour mixture to the hot mixture stirring well.

Simmer for One Hour

Chicken jallop after simmering for one hour.
STEP 10.
  1. Reduce the heat and simmer for one hour, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking.

Toast the Buns and Serve

  1. Open hamburger buns and spread each side generously with butter.
  2. Place under the broiler until toasted.

How to Serve

Finished chicken jallop over toasted hamburger buns on a serving plate.
STEP 13.
  1. To serve, remove the red pepper pod (if used). Place two bun halves in a bowl. Pour jallop over the buns and serve immediately.
Lana Stuart.

Questions? I’m happy to help!

If you have more questions about the recipe, or if you’ve made it and would like to leave a comment, scroll down to leave your thoughts, questions, and/or rating!

Thanks so much for stopping by!

Recipe

Want to save this recipe?

Enter your email below and get it sent straight to your inbox.

Save Recipe
Chicken Jallop over toasted hamburger buns on a serving plate.

Chicken Jallop

Chicken Jallop is a traditional southwest Georgia recipe and is essentially a southern chicken stew served over toasted hamburger buns.
4.89 from 9 votes
Print It Rate It
Course: Main Dishes
Cuisine: Southern, Vintage
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 45 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours
Servings: 12 servings
Calories: 491kcal
Author: Lana Stuart

Ingredients

  • 4 pound whole chicken (or chicken pieces equal to 4 pounds)
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 medium onions diced
  • 4 ribs celery diced
  • ¼ green bell pepper diced
  • 1 pod red chili pepper
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 cloves garlic finely chopped
  • ½ cup butter melted
  • 1 can cream of mushroom soup
  • Salt and pepper to taste

For serving:

  • 12 hamburger buns
  • 12 tablespoons butter

Instructions

  • Place the chicken and bay leaves in a deep pot with enough water to just cover the chicken. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook covered until the chicken is tender (about 40 minutes). (See notes for pressure cooker instructions.)
  • Remove the chicken from the broth and allow it to cool enough to handle. Remove and discard all skin and bones. Set the meat aside. Reserve all the broth.
  • While the chicken is cooking, preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  • Place the flour in a cast iron skillet and cook it in the oven, stirring about every 10 minutes, until lightly browned (this step takes about 40 minutes). Set the flour aside.
  • Chop or dice the garlic, onions, green bell pepper, and celery.
  • Bring the reserved stock to a boil. Add the vegetables and cook over medium heat for approximately 10 minutes.
  • Add all the reserved meat to the pot and bring to a gentle boil.
  • In a medium bowl, use a whisk to combine the melted butter, cream of mushroom soup, and the browned flour. Mix until thoroughly combined and free of any lumps.
  • Add the butter-soup-flour mixture to the hot mixture stirring well.
  • Reduce the heat and simmer for one hour, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking.
  • Open hamburger buns and spread each side generously with butter.
  • Place under the broiler until toasted.
  • To serve, remove the red pepper pod (if used). Place two bun halves in a bowl. Pour jallop over the buns and serve immediately.

Notes

The first step in the recipe, cooking the chicken, can easily be done in the pressure cooker or instant pot. Place the chicken in the cooker with 1 cup water. Set the instant pot for 12 minutes at high (or cook for 12 minutes after the pressure cooker achieves a seal). Cool immediately to release the pressure.

Nutrition Information

Serving 1 | Calories 491kcal | Carbohydrates 32g | Protein 19g | Fat 32g | Saturated Fat 16g | Trans Fat 1g | Cholesterol 105mg | Sodium 436mg | Potassium 245mg | Fiber 2g | Sugar 4g | Vitamin A 704IU | Vitamin C 5mg | Calcium 96mg | Iron 3mg

Nutrition information is calculated by software based on the ingredients in each recipe. It is an estimate only and is provided for informational purposes. You should consult your healthcare provider or a registered dietitian if precise nutrition calculations are needed for health reasons.

Share on Facebook Pin Recipe
Tried this recipe? Pin it for Later!Follow @LanasCookingBlog or tag #LanasCooking!

— This post was originally published on March 22, 2010. It has been updated with new photos and additional information.

A south Georgia traditional recipe for Chicken Jallop - a chicken stew served over toasted hamburger buns. https://www.lanascooking.com/chicken-jallop
4.89 from 9 votes (7 ratings without comment)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating




38 Comments

  1. Robert M. says:

    I just got off the phone with my great aunt (91), and she said she was going to make some chicken jallop and so many memories of my grandmother came back. I had to see if the rest of the world knew about this peice of southwest Georgia culture. I am glad I found a recipe. I will be fixing this soon for my son (18 monts).

    Also, my dad’s side of the family is around the D-ville area. Good to see some home folks in the comments.

    1. It is such a great old recipe and I’ve never seen it outside of southwest Georgia. I’m from Colquitt and my husband is from Donalsonville, so we’re both very familiar with it. I even included it in my cookbook that was just recently published.

  2. My grandmother used to make this, but she called it creamed chicken. She also made a variation at thanksgiving using left over turkey!
    I can’t wait to make your recipe. It looks just like hers!

      1. my mother-in-law was front Donalsonville, Seminole Co. (daughter of Dr. Minter, the town dentist & former mayor in the 1940s) and introduced jallop to this northerner. when she made it she would use crushed saltines, about 2 or 3 “sleeves,” in place of the flour to absorb the excess chicken stock. her recipe sees to be a melding of you recipe and the chicken mull recipe.

        1. Yes, that does sound like a cross between jallop and mull! How interesting. By the way, my husband is from Donalsonville and had Virginia Minter as a teacher at some point. Small world.

  3. 5 stars
    Comfort food at its best. Back in the day, the Donalsonville Lions Club often served jallop at fundraising suppers. Your recipe is terrific, but I seem to remember crumbled Saltine crackers being added at some point. Or maybe it was served over Saltines? Am I remembering this right? Thank you for sharing forgotten recipes like this. They are wonderful.

    1. Sharon, I haven’t heard of crumbling crackers into it, but it would probably be delicious!

  4. Ange Sukala says:

    5 stars
    This looks sooooooo good.

  5. Christy Ruddock says:

    I have never had this and I want to make it . But I have a question. The flour in the oven ? Is it a roux? I have read and read it again. I apologize if it’s a silly question. But I don’t want to mess it up ?

    1. Lana Stuart says:

      Hi Christy – it’s not a roux as there’s no moisture or fat added to it. It’s just dry, toasted flour. You only have to be careful not to let it burn.

  6. Onisha Ellis says:

    This reminds me of something my North Carolina mother made. She simply called his chicken stewed down slow gravy. Except forthe green pepper and bay leaf, it seems like the same thing. Thanks for the recipe. I have been searching for something like hers.

  7. Wow!! My sister and I cook this, it is the ultimate comfort food. We are from Seminole County but the recipe we were brought up with is the one using a boiled chicken, lots of celery, then saltine crackers and milk added to the broth making it very thick & served over toast. Lots of celery and black pepper and it is always better the next day. I know what we are having this weekend!!!!! Thanks for the memories.

    1. Lana Stuart says:

      That’s so interesting, Christa. I’m from Miller County and this is the recipe we’ve always used – no crackers or milk.

  8. Sounds so yummy! Just so I have a general idea, approximately how many servings will this recipe yield? I definitely gotta try this one. The recipes which I’ve made from your blog were all delicious, so thanks a bunch.

    1. Lana Stuart says:

      Angela – this makes at least 6 servings depending on the size of your chicken. A little larger chicken would stretch it to about 8 servings.

  9. Oh, I have definitely heard of Jallop. Even been to a couple of “Jallop Suppers”!
    :-)

    Sounds great. I haven’t had Jallop since I was a kid.

  10. If you want to share heritage recipes, I suggest Mama’s Turkey & Dressing. It’s a little warm for that right now, but this is something that needs a bit of practice prior to Thanksgiving!
    Take care.
    Miss P

    1. You’re right about that dressing being a heritage recipe! No one makes better dressing than Mama. Since we don’t get to be there for Thanksgiving any more, I’ve been working on it for the past few years and I’ve nearly got it down. BeeBop declared that this past Thanksgiving’s dressing was almost — almost — as good as Neena’s.

  11. Cate O'Malley says:

    Looks delicious, and total comfort food!

  12. Looks great. I haven’t made this in years. I think we started eating this over buns, because I did not have the noodles one time when I made it. We had to improvise. Yes, I do remember the chicken on the ceiling. It was one Sunday morning and we were getting ready for church. I was making something chicken for Sunday dinner. Can’t remember what. Needless to say, we did not use that chicken. I don’t think we made it to church either. If I remember right all of us had to clean the kitchen ceiling and all. What fun we had.

  13. Almost Slowfood says:

    I have never ever heard of this, but it looks so good!!! Will have to try it out.

  14. Karen Bove says:

    Oh, this reminds me of family stories and old recipes! There’s a story about my grandfather, a pressure cooker mishap and lots of corn all over the kitchen. And the recipe reminds me that I need to go through my grandmother’s recipe box again, along with her church cookbook, and start making some of those good ol’ southern favorites.

  15. Teri (evilstepmomster) says:

    Ooooh.
    I’ve never used and don’t even own a pressure cooker so thanks for giving the alternative.
    This looks way too good to pass up and easy enough too!
    Love the idea of putting it on toasted bun.
    Thanks!

  16. The Duo Dishes says:

    Never heard of this! It’s great that you’re sharing it though. Will have to ask around about jallop during the next trip to GA. Peach cobbler is the one true recipe that scream home cookin’.

  17. i personally got a kick out seeing you use the pressure cooker as i’ve heard that that nobody uses this utensil expect for the Indians & Iam one who does all her indian cooking in one. This dish is finding its place on my dinner table tonight!!!!

    1. Oh my goodness – I use my pressure cooker quite often! It makes a great beef stew in about 15 minutes. Tastes like it’s been cooking all day long.

  18. I went to the kitchen and pulled a classic cookbook. This is exactly the same recipe as Aunt Margie published in the Centennial Cookbook of First Baptist Church (1986). She was probably the best cook of her generation in the entire family. Her directions state to serve over toasted hamburger buns, or chow mein noodles. I always liked those crunchy chow mein noodles, straight out of the can, with Coca Cola.

    Howeve, I cannot undertake this recipe as directed. You might recall that time that I unfortunately kind of “blew up” the kitchen at the house on Third Street with a pressure cooker….. chicken on the ceiling …… don’t tell Mama, she may not have known about that one. I have been scarred for life, and will not touch a pressure cooker with a ten foot pole.

    Aside from that episode, thanks for the memory.

    Miss P

    1. Oh, yeah. I remember the exploding pressure cooker. How did we ever get all that mess off the ceiling? If you still can’t bring yourself to use one, you can just cook the chicken in some water until it’s done and the proceed with the recipe. It’ll just take longer.

      Actually, that cookbook is where I got the recipe. I talked to Mama about it and she said that Aunt Margie put it in the cookbook, but it’s really Polly’s recipe :-)

    2. Pat Strothman says:

      Electric pressure cookers are the only way to go. You just set and forget. They are so safe and you don’t have to watch.

      1. LOL! I was just gonna ask if y’all had heard about these new-fangled pressure cookers? My daughter gave me one for Christmas last year and I *LOVE* it. I love it so much I’m getting one for her and one for my DIL for Christmas this year! Even Better Half has learned to use the new PC and loves it – and the learning curve was miniscule, even for him (he who is not familiar with the kitchen and the stuff in it).

        But what I really need to know is … how do you pronounce “Jallop”? Is it “JALup”, or JahLOP”, or …. what? It sounds so delicious, and like Amy & Kay I’m thinking it’ll taste great over rice. Texmati basmati to be specific (no affiliation!). Or even spaghetti … hmmm … Whatever – it will be made very soon.

        1. Lana Stuart says:

          I got one of the electric pressure cookers for Christmas last year. Still sitting in the pantry in its original box. I’ll get it out soon and start playing with it, I’m sure. And it’s pronounced JAH-lup. :-)

  19. p.s so glad to see you don’t rinse your chicken either :)

    1. No, I don’t. Rinsing it can potentially contaminate everything it comes in contact with. The sink, countertops if you splash, etc. The cooking process will kill any bacteria that may be lurking on the chicken so rinsing is just not necessary and can actually be dangerous.

  20. I really, really have to make this! I second Amy on serving this over rice, though!

    Seeing this I think you might just like my Cazuela de pollo as well!

    1. Kay: I just went over and looked up your Cazuela de Pollo and it looks delicious. Much more appealing to me than the usual chicken broth and noodle type of soup. I’m making a note to try that recipe soon!

  21. Amy from She Wears Many Hat says:

    O lawd, my mouth is watering. Bet it’d be good over rice too. Yummy.