Recipes » Side Dishes » Pinto Beans with Fresh Tomato Relish

Pinto Beans with Fresh Tomato Relish

|

Rate This Recipe:

5 from 1 vote
A perfect pot of pinto beans. Great accompaniment to a southwestern dinner.
Cook Time 2 hours 30 minutes
Total Time 2 hours 35 minutes
Pinto Beans with Fresh Tomato Relish - easy and simple recipe for traditional pinto beans. Served with a fresh tomato relish, sour cream, and lime wedges. https://www.lanascooking.com/pinto-beans-fresh-tomato-relish/

Pinto Beans with Fresh Tomato Relish – easy and simple recipe for traditional pinto beans. Served with a fresh tomato relish, sour cream, and lime wedges.

Pinto Beans with Fresh Tomato Relish - easy and simple recipe for traditional pinto beans. Served with a fresh tomato relish, sour cream, and lime wedges. https://www.lanascooking.com/pinto-beans-fresh-tomato-relish/

Any time I serve a Tex-Mex inspired dinner, I almost always prepare beans as a side dish. No matter what southwestern or Tex-Mex menu you come up with, beans pretty much always go. Plus, they’re easy-peasy and budget-friendly. Cheap as dirt.

I like to serve my pinto beans with fresh tomato relish on the side. And I call it a relish because there’s no cilantro or jalapeno that you’d typically see in a pico de gallo or salsa. Still, it gives you a little brightness to perk up the beans.

How to Make Pinto Beans with Fresh Tomato Relish

Rinsing dried pinto beans under the sink tap.

Look over the beans carefully for any stones or other debris. And you do have to check them over because dried beans are a straight-off-the-farm product and some times little bits and pieces get into the final packaging. Rinse thoroughly.

Pinto beans in a pot with water, onion, and garlic.

Place the beans in a large stockpot with the water, garlic, and onion. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook slowly until the beans are very tender – at least 2 1/2 hours. Try not to stir the beans while they’re cooking. It can make them cloudy.

Get a Free Cookbook!

Subscribe now to receive our FREE Favorite Recipes digital cookbook with 10 amazing recipes inside!

Photo collage showing the making of the relish.

While the beans are cooking, make the relish. Combine all ingredients in a small bowl and stir together until thoroughly mixed. Set aside until time to serve.

Removing the onion from the cooked pinto beans.

When the beans are very tender and ready to serve, remove and discard the onion and stir in the salt. Serve the beans with the tomato relish on the side along with a dollop of sour cream and lime wedges.

A hint about storing cooked beans – let them cool all the way down before placing them in the refrigerator. Warm beans placed in the fridge can sour.

More Recipes You May Like

Pinto Beans with Fresh Tomato Relish - easy and simple recipe for traditional pinto beans. Served with a fresh tomato relish, sour cream, and lime wedges. https://www.lanascooking.com/pinto-beans-fresh-tomato-relish/

Pinto Beans with Fresh Tomato Relish

A perfect pot of pinto beans. Great accompaniment to a southwestern dinner.
5 from 1 vote
Print It Rate It Text It
Course: Side Dishes
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 2 hours 30 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours 35 minutes
Servings: 12 servings
Calories: 141kcal
Author: Lana Stuart

Ingredients

For the beans:

  • 1 pound dried pinto beans
  • 3 quarts cold water
  • 1 whole head garlic peeled
  • 1 onion peeled
  • 1 tablespoon salt

For the tomato relish:

  • 2 plum tomatoes chopped
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 small onion finely chopped
  • Dash of salt and pepper
  • 1 teaspoon vinegar

Garnish:

  • Sour cream
  • Lime wedges

Instructions

  • Look over the beans carefully for any stones or other debris.
  • Rinse thoroughly and place in a large stockpot with the water, garlic, and onion.
  • Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer.
  • Cook slowly until the beans are very tender – at least 2 1/2 hours.
  • Add the salt.
  • While the beans are cooking, make the relish. Combine all ingredients in a small bowl and stir together thoroughly.
  • When the beans are very tender and ready to serve, remove and discard the onion and stir in the salt.
  • Serve the beans with the tomato relish on the side along with a dollop of sour cream and lime wedges.

Notes

Notes: Adding salt too early in the cooking process makes beans tough. Don’t add salt until the beans are tender. Cool beans before storing in the refrigerator. Warm beans can sour if refrigerated before cooling.

Nutrition Information

Serving: 1 | Calories: 141kcal | Carbohydrates: 26g | Protein: 8g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 599mg | Potassium: 581mg | Fiber: 6g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 89IU | Vitamin C: 5mg | Calcium: 59mg | Iron: 2mg

Nutrition information is calculated by software based on the ingredients in each recipe. It is an estimate only and is provided for informational purposes. You should consult your health care provider or a registered dietitian if precise nutrition calculations are needed for health reasons.

Share on Facebook Pin Recipe
Tried this recipe? Pin it for Later!Follow @LanasCookingBlog or tag #LanasCooking!

Have you tried this recipe? I’d love for you to give it a star ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ rating in the recipe card and/or in the comments section further down. You can always stay in touch on social media by following me on FacebookInstagram, or Pinterest and Sign Up to Get my Newsletter, too!

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating




35 Comments

  1. I love the idea of a progressive dinner party! I think it would be SO much fun to do this for real! Anyway, love these beans and loved that you paired them with sour cream. That tomato relish looks sooo delicious!

    1. We’re having a great time doing these online, Angela, but you’re right, they’re so much more fun in real life!

  2. That sounds so interesting! I’ve never had it that way! Sounds tasty, I’d be tempted to keep going and make chili.

    1. You could certainly use these beans for chili. As a matter of fact, I almost always use pintos rather than kidney beans in my chili recipes. They’re more tender and tasty in my opinion.