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Apricot and Prune Stuffed Pork Loin

Succulent dried fruits make this Apricot and Prune Stuffed Pork Loin a great choice for a dinner party or an alternate entree for holidays!
4.8 from 4 votes
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Cooked stuffed pork loin on a cutting board.

Succulent dried fruits make this Apricot and Prune Stuffed Pork Loin a great choice for a dinner party or an alternate entree for Thanksgiving or Christmas!

My local grocery store was having a very nice sale on pork loin roasts recently. I don’t often buy a pork loin because with just the two of us it’s much more than we need for a meal. But I was feeling quite autumnal and wanted to do something with lovely dried fruits and a stuffed pork loin seemed just the thing!

Cooked stuffed pork loin on a cutting board.

Looking over the selection of loins, I didn’t find one close to the size that I wanted so I wheeled my cart right on over to the “service bell” and gave it a press. Out came the nice young man from the back of the meat department to see how he could help me.

“I’d like a pork loin about 2 1/2 pounds, please,” I said to him. He kindly pointed me to the case where the pork loins were.

“Yes, I saw those,” I said back to him, “but they’re all 5 or more pounds. I want a smaller piece of loin. Just 2 1/2 to 3 pounds.” A reasonable enough request, I thought.

He looked at me like I was speaking Cantonese. “That’s what we’ve got over there in the case. That’s the way ‘they’ send it to us.”

I Should Have Just Kept My Mouth Shut and Taken What Was in the Case

I have been here before. I knew better than to try to go any further with this. What I wanted to say was, “aren’t you a butcher? You work in the meat department. So cut me off a piece of loin that weighs 2 1/2 pounds. Okay?” It would have been futile.

Not long ago I selected a beautiful 3 pound chicken that I wanted to take home to fry. I’m just not very good at cutting up chickens so I wanted the grocery store “butcher” to cut it up for me.

I asked for the chicken to be cut up “for frying” assuming he would understand that I wanted two breasts, two wings, two legs, and two thighs. What I got was eight randomly hacked up pieces of chicken. Arggghhhh.

And don’t even ask me what happened when I asked if they could please “French” some lamb chops. It was embarrassing.

I Want a Real Grocery Store

Here’s what I want. I want a grocery store that has a real butcher in the meat department. One who truly knows different cuts of meat and how to prepare them himself. Not just how to display what “they” send for the meat case.

I want a butcher who can tell me where the meat I’m buying came from and where and when the fish they’re selling were caught.

I want eggs that taste like eggs and milk that tastes like milk should taste. And while I’m at it, I want produce that still has dirt on it. Greens that haven’t been hacked to pieces and sealed in cellophane bags. Apples and cucumbers that haven’t been waxed and polished until they look plastic.

And I want all this from my regular, local grocery store. Not from a “specialty” market that I have to drive an hour one-way to reach. Are you listening supermarket conglomerates?

In Which I Wax Nostalgic

What I really want is a “Mr. Wyatt’s.” When I was growing up, there was a little bitty grocery store on the town square in Colquitt. It was owned and run by Mr. Wyatt Chambers.

The store was actually named “Wyatt’s Grocery” but everybody in town called it simply Mr. Wyatt’s. And when I say little bitty, I mean teeny tiny.

I remember that it had wooden floors that creaked when you walked on them. There was one cash register and maybe two bag boys who also made deliveries. You could just call the store, give your order, and they’d run your groceries right around to your house.

Mr. Wyatt was the store owner and butcher. And he was good at his trade. All you had to do was give him a general idea of what you wanted and he got right to work on it.

Many, many times Mama would tell me to “run up to Mr. Wyatt’s and tell him I need enough ‘fill-in-the-blank’ to feed five people for supper.” Coming right up.

I can’t be sure since I was just a child, but I’d be willing to bet that most of the meat and some of the produce Mr. Wyatt sold came from local sources. And he probably did the butchering himself. It wouldn’t surprise me.

And, guess what – the produce actually had dirt on it! Imagine that. Sweet potatoes with some of the dirt they grew in still clinging to the skin. Wouldn’t that be heavenly…

Okay, enough. I know I’ve rambled when what you’re really here for is to get a recipe. So let’s get to it.

Cooked stuffed pork loin on a cutting board.

🥘 Ingredient Notes


If there was anything the least bit unusual or hard to find in the recipe ingredients, I’d explain that in this space. There’s absolutely nothing out of the ordinary in this recipe. Every regular old grocery store in America has all the ingredients.

You’ll find detailed measurements for all ingredients in the printable version of the recipe at the bottom of this post.

🔪 How to Make Apricot and Prune Stuffed Pork Loin


Rehydrate the Prunes and Apricots

Prunes and apricots soaking in water in two small bowls

To make this lovely stuffed pork loin, start by covering the prunes and apricots with hot water. Let them sit for 10-15 minutes and then drain them well.

👉 PRO TIP: Note that if your prunes are very moist, they may not need soaking. Use your own judgment.

Preheat the Oven

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and place the bottom rack in the lower third of the oven.

Stuff the Roast

Pork loin sitting on a cutting board

Use some paper towels to dry the roast before you begin prepping.

Pork loin with a knife inserted in the end to create a stuffing channel.

Stand the roast on its end and insert a long, thin-bladed knife down the center of the roast lengthwise to create an opening all the way through the meat. Twist the knife gently to enlarge the opening a little.

Hands demonstrating how to insert the apricots and prunes into the channel in the pork loin.

Stuff the length of the roast with the dried fruit alternating prunes and apricots. If necessary, stuff halfway from one end, turn the roast over and finish stuffing from the other end.

Add Vegetables

A baking pan containing carrots, onions, and celery.

Scatter the carrots, celery, and onion in the bottom of a 9×13 roasting pan.

👉 PRO TIP: The veggies serve two purposes in this recipe. Placing them in the bottom of the pan, they act as a rack for the pork loin to sit on. They also add their flavor to the roast and the sauce.

Coat the Outside of the Roast

Pork loin on a cutting board coated with mustard misture.

Combine the Dijon mustard, brown sugar, salt, garlic powder, and pepper in a small bowl. Mix well. Rub the roast all over with the mustard mixture.

The prepared pork loin resting on top of vegetables in a baking pan.

Place the roast on top of the vegetables in the roasting pan. Pour the chicken broth or stock in the pan until it comes just more than halfway up the vegetables. The level of the stock should be below the bottom of the roast.

Bake

Cook uncovered, for 45-50 minutes (calculate 20-25 minutes per pound) or to an internal temperature of 150. (The roast will increase in temperature as it rests).

Remove the roast from the oven and transfer to a carving board. Tent loosely with foil and let rest for about 10 minutes or until the internal temperature has reached 160 degrees.

Make the Sauce

Pan juices from cooking in a skillet on the stovetop

Discard the vegetables. Strain the pan juices into a small skillet or saucepan. There should be at least 3/4 cup liquid. Add a little additional chicken stock if needed. Bring to a boil.

Mix the cornstarch with 2 tablespoons of water. Stir the cornstarch mixture into the boiling pan juices. Cook, stirring, until thickened.

A slice of the finished Apricot and Prune Stuffed Pork Loin on a white serving plate with antique cutlery.

Serve slices of pork loin with a little of the sauce.

❗ Tips


  • Leftovers make delicious sandwiches! Slice the roast very thin, rewarm it and serve as an open-faced sandwich with leftover sauce drizzled on top.
  • Store any leftovers in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

🔀 Recipe Variations


If apricots and prunes aren’t your thing, there are loads of different ideas for stuffing the pork loin.

  • Try finely chopped mushrooms and Gruyere cheese.
  • Or dried apples, raisins, and walnuts.
  • Apples and cranberries make a nice stuffing as well.
  • Or try bacon (cooked) with onion, garlic, parsley, and jack cheese.

Have you tried this recipe? I’d really appreciate you giving it a star ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ rating in the recipe card or in the comments section.
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📖 Recipe

Cooked stuffed pork loin on a cutting board.

Apricot and Prune Stuffed Pork Loin

Succulent dried fruits make this Apricot and Prune Stuffed Pork Loin a great choice for a dinner party or an alternate entree for holidays!
4.75 from 4 votes
Print It Rate It Save
Course: Main Dishes
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes
Servings: 8 servings
Calories: 249kcal
Author: Lana Stuart

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds boneless top loin pork roast
  • 12 dried apricots
  • 12 prunes
  • 2 carrots trimmed and cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 2 ribs celery trimmed and cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 1 medium onion peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks
  • ¼ cup Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 cup chicken broth or stock
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch

Instructions

  • Cover the prunes and apricots with hot water. Let sit for 10-15 minutes. Drain.
  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees with the bottom rack in the lower third of the oven.
  • Stand the roast on its end and insert a thin-bladed knife down the center of the roast lengthwise to create an opening all the way through the meat. Twist the knife gently to enlarge the opening a little.
  • Stuff the length of the roast with the dried fruit alternating prunes and apricots. If necessary, stuff halfway from one end, turn the roast over and finish stuffing from the other end.
  • Place the carrots, celery, and onion in the bottom of a 9×13 roasting pan.
  • Combine the Dijon mustard, brown sugar, salt, garlic powder, and pepper in a small bowl. Mix well. Rub the roast all over with the mustard mixture. Place the roast on top of the vegetables in the roasting pan.
  • Pour the chicken broth or stock in the pan until it comes just more than halfway up the vegetables. The level of the stock should be below the bottom of the roast.
  • Cook, uncovered, for 45-50 minutes or to an internal temperature of 150. (The roast will increase in temperature as it rests).
  • Remove the roast from the oven and transfer to a carving board. Tent loosely with foil and let rest for about 10 minutes or until the internal temperature has reached 160 degrees.
  • Discard the vegetables. Strain the pan juices into a small skillet or saucepan. There should be at least ¾ cup liquid. Add a little additional chicken stock if needed. Bring to a boil. Mix the cornstarch with 2 tablespoons of water. Stir the cornstarch mixture into the boiling pan juices. Cook, stirring, until thickened.
  • Serve slices of pork loin with a little of the sauce.

Notes

  • Note: if the prunes are very moist, they may not need soaking. Use your own judgment.
  • Leftovers make delicious sandwiches! Slice the roast very thin, rewarm it and serve as an open-faced sandwich with leftover sauce drizzled on top.
  • Store any leftovers in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

Nutrition Information

Serving: 1 | Calories: 249kcal | Carbohydrates: 24g | Protein: 27g | Fat: 5g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 71mg | Sodium: 411mg | Potassium: 776mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 16g | Vitamin A: 3097IU | Vitamin C: 4mg | Calcium: 36mg | Iron: 1mg

Nutrition information is calculated by software based on the ingredients in each recipe. It is an estimate only and is provided for informational purposes. You should consult your health care provider or a registered dietitian if precise nutrition calculations are needed for health reasons.

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— This post was originally published on October 23, 2012. It has been updated with additional information.

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Recipe Rating




24 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    Lana,years ago, here in our small town, we were blessed to have a small grocery store named Klees. It was the owner, Bob Klees last name & he was a wonderful butcher! Like you, I long for someone who knows how to take care of their meats, produce & fish! I just don’t understand how someone who is CALLED a butcher, but knows nothing about their job! SMH… Love your recipes! :)

  2. 4 stars
    The pork was moist and tasty.. I used a strong mustard and I’d warn not to go all the way to 1/4 c as it was a little overpowering. I’ll use the recipe again. Thanks

    1. Yes, it depends very much on what brand Dijon you use. For instance, Maille is much more mellow than Grey Poupon (to name two commonly available brands). Other brands will definitely vary.

    1. It is surprisingly moist. As you know, lean pork can really dry out quickly. The veggies and broth in the pan along with the glaze on this roast help keep that from happening.

  3. Aw, that’s so frustrating! What’s the point of being a “butcher” if all you do is stock the cases!

    That said, I would gladly take a 5-pounder of this pork loin :)

  4. I bought a pork loin yesterday. It is in the freezer ready to be used for company or the coming holidays. Your recipe is just what I needed, since I wanted to do something different with it.
    Do you remember Gran having a meat market in his country grocery store? You have been getting specialty cuts since you were born. No wonder you get frustrated.

    1. I’ve always known that Gran was a butcher and, of course, that he and Gama had the little country store. But, I don’t really have memories of it. I must have been really small. But I’ll bet that’s where my aggravation at not being able to get the cuts of meat I want comes from :-) I’m going to start hunting down a real butcher. There’s got to be one here somewhere!

  5. Whenever I come home to Sylvester from PA, I get so frustrated with the grocery stores. If you need something even slightly out of the ordinary, you have to go to Albany for it. I never knew that salami was a specialty item. LOL Every time my parents come to visit, my mom goes crazy at the grocery store with the varieties of cheeses and breads.

  6. Oh you would love Seattle, we have butchers and fish markets everywhere. You can go do to Whole Foods where they will cut you anythng you want or just go to the local market where there are at leat 5+ butchers for you to choose from. I have to say Seattle has some of the best product in the country, I only buy everything GMO free and organic and when i travel i get pretty frustrated cause i can’t even find organic vegetables. But your pork loin looks amazing.

    1. I think I would love Seattle! As a matter of fact, the Pacific Northwest is one of the places I’d love to visit. It’s on my bucket list :-)

  7. I love this…a good, old fashioned and really pretty simple but fabulous dish. I can not help myself Lana…this is what should be stuffed into something; not Oreos. :)

    I so empathize when it comes to a grocery store. Sadly…when you find what you want? Few can really afford it. The effort to feed 300 million people in this country is gargantuan and the experiences I’ve had lately meeting some of these food producers makes one thing clear. They would be happy to do whatever it takes if the consumer is happy to pay for that effort. They simply are not.

    We have a small local ‘chain’ of sorts; I think they have three stores. Walking in there makes Whole Foods seem cheap…but they’ll do whatever you want for you!

    1. Thanks, Barb. This is just my version of a classic recipe; the type that all cooks should have in their repertoire.

      You know – I grew up in a farming community. Farming was the major industry in the area. I have to say that, from first hand experience, it’s not that difficult to get products from the farm to the retailer on a local basis. It’s when you start shipping around the world that the huge increase in costs comes in to the equation. And even if the cost is a little higher, I’d much rather support a local farmer making an effort to provide high quality products. I just can’t seem to locate that around here. The so-called “farmer’s markets” in my area truck in produce from hundreds of miles away. That’s not my idea of a farmer’s market. That’s just a grocery store by another name.

      Okay-getting down off the soapbox now.

  8. Remember Saturdays, when you could get Mr. Wyatt’s brunswick stew? In pint or quart mason jars, on top of the meat case in the back of the store. It was the absolute best. In a very small town, with no fast food establishment, Mr. Wyatt’s brunswick stew on a Saturday was a welcome change of pace.

    Oh, yes, the frustration of not having the equivilent of Mr. Wyatt. Don’t go shopping with me. I go straight to the store manager. They love to see me coming.

    Miss P

    1. Oh my word, how in the world did I forgot the brunswick stew! It was soooo good. And as you said, one of the very few options in a town with no fast food establishments. Which, in retrospect, might not have been such a bad thing. You could either get some of Mr. Wyatt’s brunswick stew or go to Nick and Jean’s. Remember them?

    1. Matt – I know so little about wine, but I do know riesling. It’s my absolute favorite. And I think it would be great with this recipe.

  9. I totally understand. When it comes to certain meats, I’ve been going to the butcher dept. at Whole Paychex or to the Italian Market (best short ribs and pork belly EVER!). I’ve gotten the “huh what?” from more grocery people than I can count and when I talk with management, I’m always given some excuse. I decided to avoid the aggravation, I’d rather take the $$ from the stiletto fund and pay for quality and customer service instead of dealing with clerks that are stuck on stupid.

    Now – that my rant is over, I LOVE the idea for this recipe! Perfect for the holidays too :) I wonder if I can soak the fruits in a bit of rum ~ you know me and cooking with “spirits”

    1. I know, Aly. It’s not even worth talking to the management. For people in the food business they know surprisingly little about food. Amazing. And soaking the fruit in rum – sounds like a fantastic idea. Maybe even brandy.

  10. Oh, I feel your pain. I recently moved from California where all grocery stores are wonderful & accommodating to the midWest, where they are um, not….
    Hang in there! :)

    1. Surely there must be small, independent stores around here. Surely. I just have to get out there and look for them.