Turkey and Southern Cornbread Dressing

by Lana Stuart on November 15, 2010 · 90 comments

Turkey and Southern Cornbread Dressing

I’m starting my Thanksgiving menu posts today with that good old southern classic Turkey and Cornbread Dressing. This is always the star of the show at our Thanksgiving dinners. The side dishes may change. The desserts may be varied. But there is always, always turkey and dressing on the menu.

Of course, I know that there are those who will debate the differences in dressing and stuffing. I suppose there are merits to each, but dressing is our tradition. Some people say that the difference is simply that stuffing is cooked inside the turkey and dressing is cooked in a separate dish. In my experience, there’s a great deal more difference than that.

The type of cornbread dressing that I, and those of a similar age and place, grew up with was as different from stuffing as night is from day. Stuffing has cubes of bread or cornbread with other wonderful additions. Vegetables, sausage, even fruit. But dressing is of a completely different texture. The cornbread is broken down to be more homogenous with the other ingredients which are typically not much more than onions, celery and stock. It’s also given some “lift” during the cooking by the addition of beaten eggs. The result is more akin to what southerners would call “souffled,” the cornbread having been lifted and lightened by the addition of the eggs.

Cornbread Dressing Recipe

What follow is, with minor modifications, my mother’s recipe for cornbread dressing. Now my Mama is the undisputed Queen of Southern Cornbread Dressing Makers. She holds the title and everyone in our small hometown knows it. Everybody in our family is crazy about her dressing and she always makes far more than is needed to feed the crowd because we all want to take leftovers home. When BeeBop and I were newly married and living far away from our southern home, Mama wrote down her dressing recipe and mailed it to me (yes, mailed it; there was no email in those days). That was 22 years ago, and I’ve used her handwritten instructions ever since. It makes me feel like she’s right there in the kitchen cooking with me.

If you want to treat your family to some authentic southern cornbread dressing, just follow this recipe.

2 onions
3 stalks celery
8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter
1/2 tsp. salt
Egg Bread (recipe follows)
1 can cream of chicken soup
32 oz. chicken broth or stock
2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. black pepper
3/4 tsp. poultry seasoning
3 eggs
Additional bread crumbs, saltine crackers, leftover biscuits or stale bread

Start by making the egg bread. The egg bread should be room temperature, so it’s easiest to make it the day before making the dressing.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Southern Cornbread Dressing

Chop the onions and celery.

Southern Cornbread Dressing

Melt the butter over medium heat in a large sauté pan. Yes, a whole stick of butter. This makes a huge dish of dressing so you probably won’t even get a half a tablespoon of butter in your serving. And anyway, it’s Thanksgiving, for Pete’s sake. Indulge! Add the onions and celery cooking slowly until tender but without browning at all. Sprinkle with the 1/2 tsp. salt while cooking.

Southern Cornbread Dressing

Meanwhile, crumble the egg bread into a large baking dish. Just break it up as small as you can with your hands. Don’t worry about it too much, you’ll work out the finer texture a little later.

Southern Cornbread Dressing

Add the soup and broth and then grab your potato masher. Yes, I said potato masher. Use the potato masher to break up the egg bread to a finer texture. You want as few lumps as possible.

Southern Cornbread Dressing

Add the sautéed vegetables, salt, pepper and poultry seasoning. Mix well. Stop here and taste the mixture. You may need a little more salt. Remember, that’s a big dish of dressing to season.

Southern Cornbread Dressing

Lightly beat the eggs and add to the dressing mixture. Your mixture should be fairly “soupy.” If you think it’s too thin, you can add some additional bread, crackers, etc. to thicken it. However, it’s rarely too wet. Even if you think it’s too wet, it’s probably not. It took me a long time to learn that. It’s just one of those cook-by-feel lessons that you acquire through making a traditional recipe over and over. If you do add more bread or crackers, be sure to crumble them well and incorporate them into the mixture.

Southern Cornbread Dressing

Bake for 35-45 minutes or until the dressing is golden brown on top and cooked throughout.

Egg Bread
2 cups finely ground white cornmeal, sifted
2 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. salt
3 eggs
2 cups buttermilk
3 tblsp. cooking oil

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees.

Egg Bread for Cornbread Dressing

Sift together the cornmeal, baking powder and salt.

Egg Bread for Cornbread Dressing

Add buttermilk and eggs, alternately.

Egg Bread for Cornbread Dressing

Pour the cooking oil into an iron skillet and place it into the hot oven. Let the batter rest while the skillet and oil are heating (about 5 minutes). Quickly pour the batter into the hot skillet and return immediately to the oven. Bake for 20-25 minutes.

Of course, Thanksgiving wouldn’t be complete without the turkey! Here’s my simple method for cooking a beautifully moist turkey with a golden, crispy skin.

Turkey
Whole turkey or turkey breast
Softened butter
Salt and pepper, or your preferred seasoned salt mixture

If your turkey is frozen, allow it to thaw unopened in the refrigerator. Allow at least 24 hours for every 4 pounds. When thawed, keep in refrigerator until ready to cook.

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.

How to cook a turkey

Remove the turkey from its packaging and, using disposable paper toweling, pat dry very thoroughly. Just look at that turkey in the upper left! I opened the packaging to find the skin split in several places. Grrr…thanks a lot Publix. Anyway, if that happens to you, don’t panic. Just do some toothpick surgery like I did. Pull the edges of the split skin together and use toothpicks to secure it. Remove the toothpicks before serving. If using a whole turkey, tuck the wing tips underneath the body and tie the legs together with twine. Place the turkey on a rack in an open roasting pan. Rub the skin all over with a generous amount of softened, room temperature butter. Sprinkle well with salt and pepper, a seasoned salt mixture, or your favorite combination of spices.

Place the pan in the oven and set a timer for about 2/3 through the cooking time. When the turkey is about 2/3 done, check for browning. You may need to cover the breast and top of drumsticks with lightweight foil to prevent over browning.

Cook according to the following time table:

4 1/2 to 7 pounds                  2 – 2 1/2 hours
7 to 9 pounds                           2 1/2 – 3 hours
9 to 18 pounds                         3 – 3 1/2 hours
18 to 22 pounds                       3 1/2 – 4 hours
22 to 24 pounds                       4 – 4 1/2 hours
24 to 30 pounds                       4 1/2 – 5 hours

Test for doneness with a meat thermometer. A thermometer placed deep within the thigh should read 180 degrees when done.

How to cook a turkey

Remove from oven and let stand at least 15 minutes before carving.

Enjoy!

Turkey and Southern Cornbread Dressing

Yield: 12-14 servings

Turkey and Southern Cornbread Dressing

An authentic recipe for traditional southern cornbread dressing and an easy turkey cooking method.

Ingredients

    For the dressing:
  • 2 onions
  • 3 stalks celery
  • 8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • Egg Bread (recipe follows)
  • 1 can cream of chicken soup
  • 32 oz. chicken broth or stock
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. black pepper
  • 3/4 tsp. poultry seasoning
  • 3 eggs
  • Additional bread crumbs, saltine crackers, leftover biscuits or stale bread
  • For the egg bread:
  • 2 cups finely ground white cornmeal, sifted
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 cups buttermilk
  • 3 tblsp. cooking oil
  • For the turkey:
  • Whole turkey or turkey breast
  • Softened butter
  • Salt and pepper, or your preferred seasoned salt mixture

Instructions

    To make the dressing:
  1. Start by making the egg bread. The egg bread should be room temperature, so it’s easiest to make it the day before making the dressing.
  2. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Chop the onions and celery. Melt the butter over medium heat in a large sauté pan. Add the onions and celery cooking slowly until tender but without browning at all. Sprinkle with the 1/2 tsp. salt while cooking.
  3. Meanwhile, crumble the egg bread into a large baking dish. Add the soup and broth and mix well using a potato masher to break up the egg bread to a fine texture. Add the sautéed vegetables, salt, pepper and poultry seasoning. Taste and adjust for more salt if needed.
  4. Lightly beat the eggs and add to the dressing mixture. Your mixture should be fairly “soupy.” If you think it’s too thin, you can add some additional bread, crackers, etc. to thicken it. Be sure to crumble them well and incorporate them into the mixture.
  5. Bake for 35-45 minutes or until the dressing is golden brown on top and cooked throughout.
  6. Make the egg bread:
  7. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Sift together the cornmeal, baking powder and salt. Add buttermilk and eggs, alternately.
  8. Pour the cooking oil into an iron skillet and place it into the hot oven. Let the batter rest while the skillet and oil are heating (about 5 minutes). Quickly pour the batter into the hot skillet and return immediately to the oven. Bake for 20-25 minutes.
  9. Cook the turkey:
  10. If your turkey is frozen, allow it to thaw unopened in the refrigerator. Allow at least 24 hours for every 4 pounds. When thawed, keep in refrigerator until ready to cook.
  11. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Remove the turkey from its packaging and, using disposable paper toweling, pat dry very thoroughly. If using a whole turkey, tuck the wing tips underneath the body and tie the legs together with twine.
  12. Place the turkey on a rack in an open roasting pan. Rub the skin all over with softened, room temperature butter. Sprinkle well with salt and pepper, a seasoned salt mixture, or your favorite combination of spices. When the turkey is about 2/3 done, cover the breast and top of drumsticks with lightweight foil to prevent over browning.
  13. Cook according to the following time table:
  14. 4 1/2 to 7 pounds 2 – 2 1/2 hours
  15. 7 to 9 pounds 2 1/2 – 3 hours
  16. 9 to 18 pounds 3 – 3 1/2 hours
  17. 18 to 22 pounds 3 1/2 – 4 hours
  18. 22 to 24 pounds 4 – 4 1/2 hours
  19. 24 to 30 pounds 4 1/2 – 5 hours
  20. Test for doneness with a meat thermometer. A thermometer placed deep within the thigh should read 180 degrees when done.
  21. Remove from oven and let stand at least 15 minutes before carving.

Notes

All text and photographs on Never Enough Thyme are copyright protected. Please do not use any material from this site without obtaining prior permission. If you'd like to post this recipe on your site, please create your own original photographs and either re-write the recipe in your own words or link to this post.

http://www.lanascooking.com/2010/11/15/turkey-and-southern-cornbread-dressing/

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{ 87 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Neena November 15, 2010 at 4:22 pm

I don’t remember sending this to you, but I know I did because you said so and that is my handwriting in the picture. Wish I could still write that ledgible now.

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2 Lana November 15, 2010 at 4:37 pm

It was when we were living in New Hampshire the first Thanksgiving we were married. I cooked dinner for several men from Bill’s ship who couldn’t go home. It was a very traditional southern Thanksgiving meal, featuring your dressing of course, and those guys did all but lick the plates clean! They said they’d never tasted food like that in their lives and when could I cook for them again :-)

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3 Jennifer @ Jane Deere November 15, 2010 at 4:26 pm

This looks delicious! My grandma and my mom both make cornbread dressing that is very similar to this, and just like your family…that’s the highlight of our holiday meals!

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4 Lana November 15, 2010 at 5:06 pm

I think everybody in our family would faint dead away if we didn’t get some of this dressing on Thanksgiving Day :-) It just wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without it.

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5 nancy@skinnykitchen.com November 15, 2010 at 4:31 pm

Your stuffing sounds incredible!

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6 Lana November 15, 2010 at 5:06 pm

Thanks, Nancy. This is dressing, though, not stuffing :-)

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7 Nutmeg Nanny November 15, 2010 at 4:33 pm

Wow this dressing looks great! It’s very similar to what I grew up eating at Thanksgiving…yum!

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8 Lana November 15, 2010 at 5:07 pm

The old classics are sometimes the best, aren’t they? And holidays are all about traditions for us. I love to try other kinds of “stuffings” but not on Thanksgiving :-)

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9 Drick November 15, 2010 at 6:16 pm

this so similar to our dressing, one handed down from my grandmother that we enjoy with loving mouthfuls during the holidays (and sometimes with baked chicken during the other times)…. hers follows the addition of a baked hen, and chopped boiled eggs to make enough that feeds an army, so good…. seeing your beautiful dressing makes me want some right now….

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10 Lana November 15, 2010 at 9:44 pm

Drick – I’ve had it with chopped boiled eggs, too, and it’s very good. I occasionally get a craving for it during the summer and make a baked hen just as an excuse to cook some dressing :-)

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11 Stephanie November 16, 2010 at 12:45 am

Yum!

I’ve only ever had stuffing, I didn’t even know about dressing until this very moment

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12 Lana November 16, 2010 at 8:03 am

Well, Stephanie, I’m so glad I could introduce you to dressing! Maybe you’ll give it a try sometime.

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13 Rocquie November 16, 2010 at 8:48 am

Yes, that’s dressing all right. It is also the star of our Thanksgiving table. I can remember my Grandmother mixing it in a dishpan (she needed to make so much) and not using a potato masher, but her hands. She’d then bake it in a huge iron skillet.

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14 Lana November 16, 2010 at 10:34 am

The dishpan sounds like a good idea, Rocquie! I’ll remember that for Thanksgiving Day :-)

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15 Lee November 16, 2010 at 9:54 am

If that doesn’t get one in the mood for Thanksgiving, I don’t know what would!

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16 Sues November 16, 2010 at 12:22 pm

This stuffing looks awesome! Of course, I’ll probably never sway from my mom’s on Thanksgiving, but this is definitely a stuffing I’d like to give a try! Happy almost Thanksgiving!!

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17 Lana November 16, 2010 at 12:53 pm

Hi Sues – Actually this is dressing, not stuffing. Big difference! Would love for you to give it a try, anyway :-)

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18 Lee November 16, 2010 at 12:26 pm

Dressing and stuffing are two different things. I thought everybody knew that.

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19 Maris (In Good Taste) November 17, 2010 at 3:31 pm

Looks delish! I love dressing (although I’ve always called it stuffing) and think it’s the best part of a Thanksgiving dinner!

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20 megan November 19, 2010 at 8:04 pm

I love family tried and true recipes! They are always the best and these pictures prove it!

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21 G-Ma November 22, 2010 at 12:24 pm

Lana, This is the DRESSING I will bake this year. Thanks for hanging in there with Dressing, when I was living in the North they had Stuffing….not the same, not as good

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22 G-Ma November 22, 2010 at 12:29 pm

Forgot to ask – what size is a large baking pan ?

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23 Lana November 22, 2010 at 12:41 pm

Thanks for asking. I use a 9×13 pan Pyrex dish for mine.

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24 Tracey November 23, 2010 at 9:36 am

Hi Lana,
I have been searching all over the internet for a dressing recipe. This looks great! What size is the egg bread?

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25 Lana November 23, 2010 at 11:46 am

I cook it in a 12″ skillet. Is that what you mean?

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26 Tracey November 23, 2010 at 9:12 pm

Yes. Thank you!

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27 meredith November 23, 2010 at 10:13 pm

I’m making dressing for the first time this year (instead of my mom) and my husband says he likes it soupy…when cooked, is your recipe a little soupy or should i just add a little extra broth than the written recipe to make it that way??? thanks so much!

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28 Lana November 24, 2010 at 8:48 am

Hi Meredith. My dressing is not soupy when it finishes cooking. Honestly, I’ve never heard of a “soupy” dressing. You might make a dressing recipe and then offer some gravy or warm broth at the table when it could be added by those who want a soupier dressing.

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29 Anika McClendon November 24, 2010 at 10:08 am

Lana,

I have searched endlessly for a dressing recipe to mimic my late mother-in-laws. My only question is can I make the egg bread in a 8×8 square pan, I don’t have a cast iron skillet. Oops another question does the bread mix have to be sifted I don’t have one of those either. The recipes looks great can’t wait to make it tomorrow.

Thanks,
Anika

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30 Lana November 24, 2010 at 12:15 pm

Anika – Yes, you can cook the egg bread in another type of pan. If it doesn’t all fit in an 8×8, use a different pan for the remainder.

You do not have to sift the cornmeal if you don’t want to.

Good luck!

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31 The Duo Dishes November 25, 2010 at 10:36 pm

If there’s no dressing, there’s NO Thanksgiving! That’s just how it is. And it far surpasses stuffing. :) Happy Thanksgiving to you!

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32 devonna March 29, 2011 at 1:52 pm

this dressing mama make t his way in the south my dont call it stuffing either we love dressing ??? from a big family

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33 Anne-Marie @ This Mama Cooks! November 14, 2011 at 12:18 pm

I’m going to be making a gluten free cornbread this Thanksgiving, too. But I’m making it Southwest style with chorizo!

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34 tina November 14, 2011 at 1:30 pm

can i use onion powder instade of onion.if yes how much onion powder do i use..thanks tina

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35 Lana November 14, 2011 at 2:39 pm

Tina – I’ve never tried substituting onion powder for chopped onion in this recipe so I can’t say what your results would be. However, I did a simple Google search for substitutions and found this guide from Taste of Home: http://www.tasteofhome.com/Cooking-Tips/Onions/Chopped-Onion-Substitute

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36 Mari @ Mari's Cakes November 14, 2011 at 7:33 pm

A must have in our Thanksgiving table. I love this side dish.

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37 Tickled Red November 15, 2011 at 11:56 am

Oh that stuffing looks nummy. I am so excited for Thanksgiving ;D We always make a wild rice stuffing and oyster dressing.

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38 Nancy@acommunaltable November 15, 2011 at 9:10 pm

Aha!! Ok, so this is dressing!! Well, since your mama’s recipe is the best, I think I definitely need to try it!

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39 Jocelyn November 18, 2011 at 1:04 pm

Being Canadian, we celebrated our Thanksgiving in October. The second Monday of October to be exact. I’ve often wondered why the difference in the two, but it seems the powers that be of each country are the deciders of what will be when.

I do love seeing all the Thanksgiving recipes available online for the upcoming US Thanksgiving though, its interesting to see how and if we differ much with what we serve at Thanksgiving. I’ve found it’s not much different at all really, except when it comes to the stuffing/dressing. I find many US stuffing recipes tend to call for cornbread, whereas here where I am, bread crumbs or cubes are the norm for stuffing, with cornbread becoming a bit more popular every year.

In my home, being born of and raised by, British parents, sage and onion stuffing, with or without sausage meat, is a must. I’m not sure I, Mom, Grandma of 8, would be very popular if she changed her secret stuffing recipe after so many years!

I do have the perfect person to try your stuffing recipe on though. I’ve been assisting an American neighbour, a widow, who was stricken with MS some years back.
When American holidays occur, my neighbour is usually okay being so far away from home, but when American Thanksgiving is to occur, my neighbour gets quite sad, as it’s the holiday that’s she misses the most.
I always try to make a little something Thanksgivingish to perk my neighbour up, and I’m pretty sure, since she loves cornbread in any form, at any time, a smaller version of your stuffing along with a roasted turkey leg or thigh, will do wonders!

Thanks for posting your Mothers stuffing recipe Lana, and all the other fantastic recipes you graciously give us, it is very appreciated.

Happy Thanksgiving!

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40 Lana November 18, 2011 at 7:37 pm

Hi Jocelyn – Just to clarify, the cornbread dressing is traditional in the southern U.S. However, many, many people serve a stuffing like you described. You might ask your neighbor which style she prefers. If you want to make her something that is very common for Thanksgiving throughout the U.S., I’d suggest a pumpkin pie.

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41 Jocelyn November 18, 2011 at 10:18 pm

Oh yes, I know your dressing/stuffing is more southern, and I’m quite sure that’s why my neighbour will love it so much. As for the pumpkin pie, it’s a favourite of her’s and mine. We do quite well seeing who can eat the most!

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42 Mallory Hamilton November 23, 2011 at 10:20 am

Thank you thank you thank you! I’ve been looking for a traditional southern egg bread dressing recipe online for a couple of years and have always come up short! This is the recipe I remember making with my grandmother. And, in response to another commenter, our dressing was always “soupier” than most; which my grandmother accomplished just by adding extra broth. I’ll be making my eggbread today. Happy thanksgiving from Augusta, GA!

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43 Jan Stoddard November 23, 2011 at 1:28 pm

Will be trying your recipe in the morning, but already have my cornbread portion baked and crumbled for my dressing along with my white bread crumbs. But will go by the rest of your ingredients for Thanksgiving dinner tomorrow. I just can’t wait. Thank you for your picture instructions and for sharing your recipe. Will try your ‘egg bread’ recipe for Christmas dinner.

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44 CNealy November 23, 2011 at 2:47 pm

I made this today for our Potluck at work and it recieved a great response the only thing i did differently was I used 3 boxes of Jiffy Cornbreand and 28 oz of Sodium reduced Chicken Broth. If I had the time I would have made the bread,, it looks awesome! Thank you for the recipe this is a great one! =)

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45 Shirley Strickland November 23, 2011 at 10:40 pm

Thanks for putting this on here! It is the same way my grandmother used to make her dressing.
Now I am a great grandmother and I am still making it the same way
Just thought would ck on here see if anything better
This has worked for me all my life and my sister soo why try and change such a good thing?
Soo many folks out there don,t know this good way so once again thanks for putting it on here for others
yours truly Shirley Strickland Happy T hanksgiving to you and yours!

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46 Tracey Nelson November 24, 2011 at 11:12 am

I made this last year and it was the best dressing ever! We all loved it. I am making it again today. Thanks for the great recipe.

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47 Jackie Newsome November 24, 2011 at 7:01 pm

I finally found one that is close to my mother-in-laws. She uses the boiled eggs and adds cooked chicken or hen to hers. But I will be trying yours this year just to see how it tastes. Oh and I make both stuffing and dressing since I’m from the north and my husband is born and bred southern. Can’t do without either one. They’re both great :)

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48 Judy Morin December 4, 2011 at 12:10 pm

I am so excited to find this recipe as I have been looking for a true southern cornbread dressing for a long time. This sounds fabulous and I will be trying this for Christmas. Thank you so much!!

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49 KellyD December 4, 2011 at 8:43 pm

Hi Lana, I love your site! Can’t wait to try these wonderful southern recipes; so many to choose from! I started with this one. I made your dressing for Thanksgiving dinner and it tasted amazing! But I had texture issues I was hoping you might help me with. Mine turned out crumbly. I followed your recipe exactly, with two changes. I added chopped boiled eggs. And I assembled it the night before, refrigerated overnight, then baked it the next day. Do you think my changes could have caused the crumbly texture? I allowed a longer cooking time since it was cold, and it was hot and golden on top when removed it from the oven. It seemed like if I cooked it longer it could have dried out (or at least that was my fear). But do you think I should have cooked it longer? Any insight would be much appreciated! Thank you!

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50 Lana December 5, 2011 at 8:35 am

Hi Kelly – The eggs wouldn’t have affected it at all, but the prepping ahead would. If the dressing is prepped and held overnight, it would definitely dry out. The cornmeal/cornbread would absorb so much of the liquid that you would definitely get a dry, crumbly texture. What I always do is cook my cornbread the day before and store it in the fridge overnight. Then prepare your dressing when you’re ready to cook it the next day.

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51 KellyD December 9, 2011 at 3:15 pm

Thanks so much, Lana! Can’t wait to try it again on Christmas!

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52 ANNA December 8, 2011 at 6:11 pm

Hi Lana
I am making dressing for the first time for Christmas this year and yours look so good and I will be cooking it, wish me luck. this will be my first Christmas that I have cooked for my Husband we alway go to his mom’s for Thanksgiving and Christmas but this year I want to cook.
Thank you

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53 Lana December 9, 2011 at 2:22 pm

Good luck to you, Anna! Hope it turns out perfectly.

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54 Debbie Davis December 24, 2011 at 1:34 pm

I’ve been looking for a recipe like my grandmother’s and mother’s similar to this. They put meat from the Turkey neck bone, raw egg, chopped boiled egg, chopped giblets with broth, celery, onion, and sage. They used a cornbread made in a skillet using a recipe with flour. What would be the difference in using eggbread rather than cornbread? My family was from Alabama.?

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55 Judy Morin March 5, 2012 at 2:23 pm

I have to let you know this is the best corn bread recipe I have ever had. I made this for Christmas but unfortunetly my husband and I both came down with the flu so we didn’t get to enjoy it. But here it is March and I decided to make this recipe today. It was excellent and alas we did get to enjoy it! Thanks again for sharing your recipe.

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56 Lana March 5, 2012 at 2:57 pm

I’m so pleased that you enjoyed my recipe, Judy. Actually, it’s my mom’s recipe and the only one our family has used for years and years. Hope you’ll visit the blog again and fine more delicious things to cook for your family.

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57 Tanya May 1, 2012 at 7:05 pm

Just discovered your blog and am so glad I did. This looks amazing. I love cornbread dressing and attempted to make a batch last thanksgiving without success. Your version looks like a real winner. I can’t wait to give it a try.

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58 Valerie July 14, 2012 at 8:41 pm

I will try your recipe tomorrow.I know it is going to turn out goodbit the same recipe think that my mom use to make.

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59 Patti November 11, 2012 at 4:53 pm

Lana,
The southern cornbread dressing was incredible and easy. This was not first time to make dressing and your instructions made it easy.
How do you make turkey gravy?
Patti

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60 Rachel@Time for Good Food November 15, 2012 at 9:25 am

This is similar to my Granny’s recipe except she also adds chicken to it. She would save her cornbread and extra biscuits in the freezer all year so she’d have plenty of bread to work with come November. Now that she is in her 80s and no longer cooking, my aunt has taken over dressing duties. Hers is *almost* as good. There’s just something extra special about Granny’s! Thanks for sharing! :)

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61 Lynda Lamm November 20, 2012 at 11:12 pm

My mother is 83, in a nursing home with Parkinson’s; she was the best cook ever. Last year I tried to make her dressing, but it was too dry. Mama also put leftover biscuits, etc. in it, along with a fried white corn meal “hoecake.” She learned a lot about cooking from my dad’s mother. She did not make an eggbread; and she added chopped boiled eggs and the turkey giblets. This was my favorite dish of any holiday, hands-down. I may try this recipe, and tweak it towards my mother’s version. I’m so glad to find an on-line version of this incredible culinary delight.

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62 Jeannie November 17, 2012 at 6:33 pm

i love this.. this is almost the same way my mama made it and i do now.
I was raised in the south..although moved several times away and still love this type of southern cooking! Your site brought me back to when i was younger..thank you for this!!
Have a wonderful Thanksgiving and remember why we can celebrate our freedom!!
Thanks be to our Lord!

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63 vicky November 21, 2012 at 11:03 am

wheres the sage?????

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64 Lana November 21, 2012 at 12:08 pm

It’s included in the poultry seasoning. We don’t like much sage in our dressing, Vicky, so that little bit works just fine. You can add as much as you like.

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65 Heather Morgan November 21, 2012 at 11:10 am

This is almost just like my maternal grandmother’s dressing. We always eat it a bit soupy, though, instead of firm. My husband grew up on regular cornbread dressing, and he is still a little creeped out by the eggbread, but this type of dressing is deeeelicious! I have the challenge today and tomorrow of trying to create a cornbread dressing that is more firm like my other grandmother used to make. Wish me luck :)

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66 Lana November 21, 2012 at 12:09 pm

Good luck!

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67 Tracey November 22, 2012 at 1:38 am

This is the best cornbread dressing ever! I tried so many other recipes and then found this one. This will be my third year making it. The only thing I do differently is use Trader Joe’s cornbread mix instead of making my own egg bread. It still turns out great!

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68 Lana November 22, 2012 at 8:18 am

I’m so glad y’all like it, Tracey! I made my cornbread yesterday and I’m just about ready to get in the kitchen and mix up the dressing. It’s always the star of the table here on Thanksgiving.

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69 Debbie November 22, 2013 at 9:30 am

Can I prepare this the night before then bake the next day? Just want to make sure it doesn’t soak up all my “wet” ingredients and end up gooey the next day … This recipe looks so much like what my mom used to make .. but we never got her recipe perfected. Thank you for posting this!!

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70 Lana Stuart November 22, 2013 at 8:36 pm

Debbie – if you make the dressing the day before, I’m pretty sure you’d need to add more broth to it before cooking. The cornbread would really soak it up overnight. What I do is this – the day before I make, cool, and crumble the cornbread and store it in a large zip bag. I also saute the onions and celery, cool that and store in the fridge overnight. On Thanksgiving I mix everything together and bake it off. Just takes a few minutes to put together.

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71 Robin December 16, 2012 at 1:52 pm

Our church had it’s Christmas Luncheon today and I asked who made the stuffin’. Blank looks. I was told the Yankie in me came out (was born in NY but raised in South). That in the South, it’s called dressing. In the North, it’s stuffing. Who knew! So I came home looking for a cornbread DRESSING recipe and came across this page and the comments on stuffing vs dressing. Too funny!

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72 Karen June 21, 2013 at 9:58 pm

This recipe for dressing is very similar to the one that I make, however, we LOVE the flavor of sage…therefore, I not only use the poultry seasoning but also the sage…and quite a lot more celery and onion and raw eggs. I have never added the cream of chicken soup, but am sure it would be good! I also use the broth straight off my cooked turkey when I make it…if need be, I supplement the recipe with the Swanson’s Chicken Broth! Love ALL your recipes…keep them comin’ :)

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73 angelitacarmelita September 17, 2013 at 11:09 am

Sometimes, when I read recipes of yours, I just well up with tears…. It’s like reading recipes from either one of my late grandmomma’s, my aunts, or my own mothers recipe boxes. And its so funny to read people’s remarks about “dressing vs. stuffing”. As a southerner, I didn’t know what stuffing was until I was in my 20′s! All I ever knew was that we had “dressing” on Thanksgiving! We’ve never added the chicken soup either, momma always used the broth from the turkey necks & gizzards that she eventually turned into giblet gravy to serve along side the meal (and the dressing of course). It’s still the most favorite part of our Thanksgiving meal. Thank you so much for sharing these recipes and memories with us.

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74 Lana Stuart September 17, 2013 at 8:39 pm

Angelita – I just have to tell you how much your comment means to me. I even shared it with my Facebook followers. It’s comments like yours that keep bloggers like me going when we’re not sure whether it’s worth all the time, cost, and effort. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

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75 Connie November 8, 2013 at 8:30 am

Hi there. Lana plan to make your wonderful looking dressing. Can I make it earlier than Thanksgiving day and freeze it? Your thoughts please. Since I’m 71 I like to make what I can ahead of time. Thanks

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76 Lana Stuart November 8, 2013 at 11:18 am

Good question, Connie! And honestly…I’m not sure. I have not in all these years tried freezing the dressing. I do prepare it ahead of time by cooking my cornbread a day or two in advance and sauteing the vegetables. I have that all ready to go in the fridge and just pull it out and mix it up on Thanksgiving morning. You can mix it early in the day and let it sit in the fridge, but be sure to bring it to room temperature before baking. Also, if it has been standing for a while, be sure to check whether it needs a bit more broth. That cornbread really soaks it up!

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77 Amanda November 13, 2013 at 11:31 am

Lana, I am so excited that sweet people like you still exist in this world. I am 33 yrs old and not a very good cook but I try. I want to cook homemade dressing for Thanksgiving but was afriad I could not do it. This step by step recipe reafirmed my faith and with this I know I can do it. I was 23 when my mom passed away and my dad just passed away 6 months ago. They were both wonderful cooks!!! This recipe brings tears to my eyes, its what I remember eating when I was a kid. Thanks again and wish me good luck.

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78 Lana Stuart November 13, 2013 at 11:39 am

Amanda – comments like yours are what make all the work involved in a food blog totally worth it! Here’s wishing you all the luck in the world! By the way, I’ll be monitoring my email all during Thanksgiving. You just email me any time if you have a question about the recipe. I’ll be happy to try to help!

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79 Jean Campbell November 20, 2013 at 10:10 am

There was a recent pin on Pinterest showing family recipes framed with a burlap mat. Your handwritten recipe needs a linen mat and a place of honor.

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80 Christy November 26, 2013 at 1:00 pm

Can I use jiffy cornbread mix? I usually do and I think it’s sweet but the fam likes it. I just add sage, poultry seasoning, s/p, broth and celery so it’s plain but the sweet gives it a little more interest.

I want to change it up but not too much and this looks great! I just bought my cornbread mixes tho. Would it work?

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81 Lana Stuart November 26, 2013 at 1:23 pm

Hi Christy – If you want an authentic taste, Jiffy won’t work. First, it’s yellow cornmeal instead of white and secondly, it’s way too sweet. It also has a very different texture than this egg bread. It’s okay sometimes, I guess, but it won’t make *this* recipe correctly.

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82 Theresa November 27, 2013 at 4:38 pm

Ver similar to my moms dressing. I’m tryin yours now! Can I prepare it all tonight and refrigerate it until I cook it tomorrow?

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83 Lana Stuart November 27, 2013 at 7:08 pm

Theresa – it will absorb too much liquid if you mix it up tonight and it’ll be very dry when you bake it. I don’t advise mixing it in advance.

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84 Bkelley November 27, 2013 at 5:06 pm

Lana, all those ingredients, the i.e., Egg Bread (recipe follows)
1 can cream of chicken soup
32 oz. chicken broth or stock is for if you only do one pan of egg bread correct? so I should just double all of that if I make two or three egg breads correct?

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85 Lana Stuart November 27, 2013 at 7:08 pm

Yes, the recipe as written is for one batch of dressing using one pan of egg bread.

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86 amber November 28, 2013 at 7:17 pm

THis recipe is the one I chose as my first time ever making dressing. IT IS AMAZING! All the guest said it was the best they ever had.

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87 Lana Stuart November 28, 2013 at 7:41 pm

I’m so glad you all enjoyed it!

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