Recipes » Condiments and Extras » Make Your Own Butter

Make Your Own Butter

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5 from 6 votes
Use heavy cream to make your own butter at home. Tastes so much better than store bought butter!
Total Time 7 hours
How to Make Your Own Butter - More delicious than any butter you ever bought at the grocery store. Spread some on warm bread for a heavenly treat. https://www.lanascooking.com/how-to-make-your-own-butter/

Make Your Own Butter – More delicious than any butter you ever bought at the grocery store. Spread some on warm bread for a heavenly treat.

How to Make Your Own Butter - More delicious than any butter you ever bought at the grocery store. Spread some on warm bread for a heavenly treat. https://www.lanascooking.com/how-to-make-your-own-butter/

Okay. I know there’s a less than zero chance that anyone who reads this blog is ever going to make their own butter. I also already know that you think I’m totally crazy for doing it, too, so please don’t feel that you have to comment on that :-)  Thank you very much.

It was just one of those things I’d never done and I wanted to see if I could do it. You understand, right?

And let me tell you something…you have never, ever tasted butter that tastes like this! Oh. My. Gracious. Goodness. It’s so much sweeter, so much butterier than any butter I’ve ever had. And it only took about ten minutes from start to finish.

So, some weekend when you have nothing else to do, buy a quart of heavy cream and make yourself some real, true butter. Then spread it on some lovely warm bread. You’ll absolutely love it!

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How to Make Your Own Butter

Two pints of heavy cream.

You’ll need cream that is at least 30% butterfat, or heavy whipping cream. I couldn’t actually find the percentage of butterfat on any of the cartons of cream at my grocery store so I just had to trust that this heavy whipping cream would do the trick.

Ripen the cream by letting it stand at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours. It will thicken and become mildly sour. This helps to give the butter a mild, good taste. Cool the cream again in your refrigerator for about an hour.

Cream in the bowl of a stand mixer.

Pour the cream into a large electric mixer bowl. Add a few drops of yellow food coloring, if desired. I used six drops and that was just a bit too much. Probably four would have been just right.

Cream being whipped in a stand mixer.

Beat at high speed until flecks of butter begin to form. This will start to happen when it has passed the “whipped cream” stage. Just keep watching and you’ll see it start to separate.

Turn the mixer to low speed until the butter separates from the milk. Watch to keep the spattering to a minimum. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a spatula as the cream whips.

Butter separating from the milk.

You’ll definitely know when it separates. All the butter will clump together and mass around the beater or whisk.

Straining the butter from the buttermilk.

Once the butter has separated from the milk, strain off the buttermilk. The buttermilk is what’s left when the butter separates out from the cream. Don’t throw that away, though! It’s great for making biscuits or pancakes, or anything that uses buttermilk.

Washing the butter.

Now, “wash” the butter either by hand under cold, running water or in the mixer.

If washing by hand, gather the butter into a mass in your hands and “knead” it very gently under cold running water until the water runs clear. You really have to get out all of the buttermilk that was caught up with the butter. It will make your butter go bad much more quickly if you don’t.

If using the mixer, place the butter back in the bowl and add cold water, about as much as there was buttermilk. Let the mixer run at its lowest speed. Pour off the water; repeat.

Add a scant tablespoon of salt and let the beater mix it into the butter. Remove the beater(s), scrape off the butter with a spatula, and work out any remaining water with a spatula by pressing the butter against the side of the bowl. Be sure to work out all of the water.

Finished butter and buttermilk in glass containers.

Mold the butter in a butter press or empty it into a container with a tightly fitting lid. I put mine in a vintage 1950’s refrigerator box. I just somehow felt that was the most appropriate container I had for storing homemade butter! The liquid in the jar is the buttermilk I strained out earlier.

Store the butter and buttermilk in the refrigerator. One quart of cream makes about one pound of butter, although it depends on how heavy the cream is.

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How to Make Your Own Butter - More delicious than any butter you ever bought at the grocery store. Spread some on warm bread for a heavenly treat. https://www.lanascooking.com/how-to-make-your-own-butter/

How to Make Your Own Butter

Use heavy cream to make your own butter at home. Tastes so much better than store bought butter!
5 from 6 votes
Print It Rate It
Course: Condiments and Extras
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 7 hours
Total Time: 7 hours
Servings: 32 servings
Calories: 102kcal
Author: Lana Stuart

Ingredients

  • 2 pints heavy cream (1 quart)
  • 1 tablespoon salt optional
  • 4 drops yellow food coloring optional

Instructions

  • Ripen the cream by letting it stand at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours. It will thicken and become mildly sour. This helps to give the butter a mild, good taste. Cool cream again in refrigerator for about an hour.
  • Pour cream into large electric mixer bowl. Add a few drops of yellow food coloring, if desired. Beat at high speed until flecks of butter begin ro form. Then turn to low speed until butter separates from milk. Watch to keep the spattering to a minimum. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a spatula as the cream whips.
  • Pour off buttermilk.
  • Now, “wash” the butter either by hand under cold, running water or in the mixer. If washing by hand, gather the butter into a mass in your hands and “knead” it gently under running water until the water runs clear. If using the mixer, place the butter back in the bowl and add cold water, about as much as there was buttermilk. Let beater run at lowest speed. Pour off water; repeat.
  • Add a scant tablespoon of salt. Let beater mix it into butter. Remove beaters, scrape off butter with spatula and work out any remaining water with a spatula by pressing butter against side of bowl. Be sure to work out all of the water.
  • Mold butter in a butter press or empty it into a container with a tightly fitting lid. Store in refrigerator. One quart cream makes about 1 pound butter, although it depends on how heavy the cream is. One serving = 1 tablespoon.

Notes

Nutrition Information

Serving: 1 | Calories: 102kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 11g | Saturated Fat: 7g | Cholesterol: 41mg | Sodium: 229mg | Potassium: 22mg | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 435IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 19mg | Iron: 1mg

Nutrition information is calculated by software based on the ingredients in each recipe. It is an estimate only and is provided for informational purposes. You should consult your health care provider or a registered dietitian if precise nutrition calculations are needed for health reasons.

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42 Comments

  1. Homemade butter looks so … so…… just so wonderful.
    I want to try this….. and serve it with hot from the oven Buttermilk Biscuits. I make some pretty good biscuits!

  2. I just made my homemade butter using a different recipe and it turned out wonderful! My husband found this site as he was amazed by how easy it was to do so he went looking. I’m in Canada so I used Quebon 35% whipping cream and I did not leave it at room temp but straight from the fridge to my kitchen aid bowl. Whipped it until it became a solid. It was a wonderful yellow colour not needing any food colouring. I did not put salt in as most of my recipes call for unsalted butter. The liquid that is left is good to use in any recipe where you need some liquid.